MCW/Marquette Medical Alumni Association

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  Summer 2010 issue (pdf)

In Memoriam

Alumni News accepts and publishes obituaries of Medical College of Wisconsin, Marquette School of Medicine, and Marquette University School of Medicine alumni.

Edward R. Annis, MD ’38, died Sept. 14, 2009, at his home in Miami, Fla. He was 96 years old. Dr. Annis was a general surgeon and chief of surgery at Mercy Hospital in Miami, Fla. He also served as president of the American Medical Association from 1963-1964 and as President of the World Medical Association. He was the Director of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States from 1969-1975. He was instrumental in championing legislation for pasteurizing milk in the state of Florida. He enjoyed playing tennis and spending summers in Alabama, where he was most proud of his blueberries. He is survived by his eight children, 14 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Betty.

Francis X. Paletta, MD ’39, of Kirkwood, Mo., died Feb.12, 2009. He was 93 years old. He served as an Army battalion surgeon during World War II, then in 1950 he joined the surgery faculty at St. Louis University and formed a residency program there in 1954. Dr. Paletta started the Midwest’s first cleft palate service at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center in St. Louis in 1956, and served as chief of the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery until his retirement in 1985. He also started the plastic surgery service at John Cochran Veterans Administration Hospital in St. Louis. He was the founding member of both the Plastic Surgery Research Council and the American Society of Surgery of the Hand. Dr. Paletta is survived by his wife, Mary, eight children, 25 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

George J. Worm, MD ’40, of Wauwatosa, Wis., died Jan. 15, 2010, of congestive heart failure. He was 93 years old. When Dr. Worm began practicing general medicine he made house calls, a tradition and service he continued for four decades. Upon completing his medical degree, he served in the Navy in the southwest Pacific for four years. He is survived by his eight children, 21 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ruth, and a daughter.

Myron Schuster, MD ’41, died Jan. 30, 2010, in Racine, Wis. He was 91 years old. Dr. Schuster was the chief of pathology at St. Mary’s Medical Center in Racine for 44 years. He is survived by his two sons, grandson and great-granddaughter. He was preceded in death by his wife Beverly of 16 years, and wife Phyllis of 42 years.

Rosario “Russ” Fisichella, MD ’43, of San Diego, Calif., died Nov. 26, 2009. He was 91 years old. After serving as a captain in the Army during World War II, Dr. Fisichella practiced as an OB/GYN in Monterey, Calif. At age 39, he returned to active duty in the Navy and was involved in establishing and commanding the first naval hospital in Saigon during the Vietnam War. He earned 15 decorations from the military including the “Legion of Merit.” After his military career, Dr. Fisichella practiced general medicine in Poway, Calif., for 20 more years. He is survived by his wife, Terrye Anne, four children and one grandchild.

John Kassis, MD ’43, died Feb. 9, 2010, in Sacramento, Calif. He was 94 years old. Dr. Kassis practiced general medicine for almost 50 years in private practice. He was also a major in the Army Medical Corps., and was a business man who developed many apartments and commercial properties in the Sacramento area. He is survived by his wife, Marion, four children, eight grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

Robert M. Anderson, MD ’46 (March), died Jan. 8, 2010, in Tucson, Ariz. He was 89 years old. Dr. Anderson served as chief of cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Arizona Medical Center, and as associate dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He is survived by his wife, Alice, four sons, 12 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

Leonard W. Kuehnle, MD ’46 (March), of Blue Ash, Ohio, died March 15, 2010. He was 90 years old. Dr. Kuehnle practiced as an OB/GYN in Cincinnati, Ohio, was on the executive committee at the Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati and spent many years involved in the American Medical Association and the Cincinnati Academy of Medicine. He was an avid Cincinnati Reds baseball fan. Dr. Kuehnle is survived by his daughter and grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary, and two sons.

Peter J. Bartzen, MD ’48, of Manitowoc, Wis., died July 27, 2009. He was 83 years old. After serving in the Navy as a Naval doctor, Dr. Bartzen practiced obstetrics at the Duluth Clinic LTD and St. Mary’s Duluth Clinic, both in Minnesota. Practicing for 37 years, Dr. Bartzen delivered 10,534 babies in his lifetime. He was also an Emeritus Trustee at the College of St. Scholastica in Minnesota, and served as president of its board of trustees. He is survived by seven children, 21 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife of 57 years, MaryAnn.

Lorraine Sievers, MD ’50, of Detroit, Mich., died March 24, 2010. She was 87 years old. She practiced as an OG/GYN in Detroit for many years.
Courtney E. Quandt, MD ’52, of Jefferson, Wis., died Oct. 9, 2009, at his home. He was 83 years old. Dr. Quandt worked with his brother in their family medical practice in Jefferson for 37 years. He was also an ensign in the Navy during World War II, and served in Guam. He is survived by his wife, Linda, four children, seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Arlene.

Craig Larson, MD ’56, of Wauwatosa, Wis., died Jan. 15, 2010. He was 80 years old. Dr. Larson practiced psychiatry and was a community volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Ann, four children and three grandchildren.

Aivars A. Zeps, MD ’56, GME ’68, of Milwaukee, Wis., died April 9, 2010. He was 83 years old. He was a dedicated physician until his retirement in 1998. Born in Latvia, he immigrated to the United States from Germany in 1950, after living in a displaced persons camp in Lubeck, Germany, for five years. Dr. Zeps greatly enjoyed nature and was active in Latvian cultural activities. He is survived by his wife, Mara, one daughter and two grandchildren.

Gale L. Mendeloff, MD ’58, died March 6, 2010, in Palm Desert, Calif., after experiencing trauma due to a fall. He was 76 years old. Dr. Mendeloff was first an Instructor, then a Clinical Professor of Surgery at The Medical College of Wisconsin. He began a private practice at Columbia St. Mary’s Hospital in Milwaukee as a staff physician in 1963, and later became the Chairman in the hospital’s Department of Surgery, Director of the Vascular Laboratory and Chief of Staff prior to his retirement in 2002. He also served as president of the Milwaukee Surgical Society, the Milwaukee Academy of Surgery, and the Wisconsin Surgical Society. He is survived by his wife, Sunny, four sons (including Jeffrey Mendeloff, MD ’90) and five grandchildren.

Ronald Rudy, MD ’59, died Jan. 30, 2010, at his home in Middleton, Wis. He was 76 years old. Upon graduation from medical school, Dr. Rudy served as a medical officer in the Navy. After residency training, he practiced orthopaedic surgery at Dean Clinic in Madison, Wis. He also served as chairman of St. Mary’s Hospital Medical Center’s department of surgery in Madison, and an associate clinical professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Wisconsin. He was a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. After retiring in 1996, he continued to serve as a volunteer physician at the Benevolent Specialist Project- Free Clinic. He was inducted into the Kenosha Sports Hall of Fame in 1990 for his talent in high school football. Dr. Rudy is survived by his wife, Petie, three children and two grandchildren.

Read R. Nielson, PhD ’61, of Oxford, Ohio, died June 29, 2007 of complications from Parkinson’s disease. He was 78 years old. While in the Navy, he became a radio officer on the USS Rochester during the Korean War. He was a researcher and Professor of Zoology at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, for 37 years. He flew and taught flying for most of his life. Dr. Nielson is survived by his wife Annie, four children and six grandchildren.

John Edward Keith, MD, GME ’63, died July 7, 2009, in Albuquerque, Ariz. He was 80 years old. Dr. Keith practiced as a pathologist in Joliet, Ill. for 33 years. He is survived by his wife, Norma, four children and seven grandchildren.

William S. Lambert, MD ’71, GME ’76, of Wilton, Maine, died June 18, 2008, after a two-year battle with leukemia. He was 62 years old. An orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Lambert was a team doctor for the Green Bay Packers, Milwaukee Bucks and Milwaukee Brewers. He served as a lieutenant in the Navy, caring for Marines at the Naval Hospital in Quantico, Va. He spent most of his career in Maine, practicing primarily at Franklin Memorial Hospital and Aroostook Medical Center. He retired in 2008. His survivors include his wife of 24 years, Jeanne; two daughters; three grandchildren; his former wife and children’s mother; and step children and grandchildren.

James A. Leibsohn, MD ’74, Fel ’79, of River Hills, Wis. died March 31, 2010. He was 62 years old. Dr. Leibsohn practiced cardiology in Milwaukee. He is survived by his wife, Anna, and two young children.

Fred Ozawa, MD ’74, died March 22, 2009, in Las Vegas, Nev. He was 61 years old. After completing a residency in the Navy at the Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., Dr. Ozawa became a family physician in Visalia, Calif., eventually as a partner with the Sierra Medical Group. In 1991, he relocated to Las Vegas and practiced there for the last 18 years. He also spent several years as a physician for Hospice. He is survived by his wife, Sharleen, four children and two grandchildren.

James Henry Nagel, MD, GME ’77, of Hartland, Wis., died Jan. 7, 2009. He practiced ophthalmology in Waukesha, Wis., and in Missouri.

Paul E. Newton, PhD ’79, of Kalamazoo, Mich., died Oct. 23, 2008. He was 63 years old. Dr. Newton was a Diplomat of the American Board of Toxicology and was most recently employed by MPI Research in Mattawan, Mich. He enjoyed golf and fishing. His survivors include his wife of 38 years, Julie; three daughters; and four grandchildren.

Edward W. Carroll, PhD ’82, of Germantown, Wis., died Feb. 10, 2010. He was 67 years old. Dr. Carroll was a clinical assistant professor of anatomy and physiology at Marquette University for 25 years. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne, four children and three grandchildren.

Susan L. Kaehler, MD, GME ’87, died Jan. 28, 2010, in West Allis, Wis. She was 58 years old. Dr. Kaehler practiced adult psychiatry at Psychiatric Consultants and Therapists in Milwaukee, and she was a clinical professor of psychology and neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She was an active member of the American Psychiatric Association and the Wisconsin Psychiatric Association. She is survived by her partner, Michael Finley, and son.

Rick J. Andrews, MD ’94, of West Hollywood, Calif., died Oct. 21, 2009. He was 52 years old. He practiced at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Calif. He enjoyed writing poetry.

Lawrence K. Rowlands, MD ’95, died of a heart attack Oct. 12, 2009, in his home in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was 51 years old. Dr. Rowlands practiced medicine for 13 years, including at Integrated Physical Medicine, his Salt Lake City practice. He enjoyed skiing, hiking, rock climbing and adventuring. In addition to mountains in California and Utah, he traveled in the last 10 years to Argentina, Chile, Peru, Honduras, Vietnam, Thailand, the Philippines, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Croatia, Denmark, Ukraine and Turkey.

Lisa Ellen Woody, MD, MPH ’96, died Jan. 18, 2010, after a nearly two-year battle with lung cancer. She was 51 years old. After four years in internal medicine, she changed her focus to acute care and occupational medicine. She practiced at the William W. Backus Hospital in Norwich, Conn., and at the Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. She is survived by her husband, Robert O. McAlister, four children and three stepchildren.

Other special remembrances

Jessica S. Lin, MD, of San Francisco, died Feb. 6, 2010, in a motor vehicle crash. She was a fifth-year resident in the Department of Neurosurgery at The Medical College of Wisconsin and divided her time between Froedtert Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. She was also an accomplished violinist. She is survived by her husband, Les Thomas, MD.

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