Goveas Laboratory

Goveas Laboratory

Background

The Joseph Goveas laboratory aims to understand the complex relationships between neurocognitive functioning and emotional regulation in older adults with and without depression and cognitive impairment. Specifically, Dr. Goveas's current research focuses on the following areas: Determination of the shared and distinct neurophysiologic features associated with cognitive aging and different phenotypes of depression in late life, identification of biomarkers of brain structure and function that could serve as predictors of treatment response in late-life depression, and exploration of neuroimaging markers that could serve as predictors of depression in those at risk. Another line of research is dedicated to examine the independent and additive contributions of depression and risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease on brain function and structure in clinically asymptomatic middle-aged and older adults. His research team utilizes comprehensive clinical and neuropsychiatric assessments coupled with advanced multimodal neuroimaging to measure brain networks and sophisticated data analytic methods to answer these critical questions.

To achieve these goals, his laboratory collaborates closely with the Piero Antuono laboratory, Shi-Jiang Li laboratory (for resting-state functional connectivity MRI), Tugan Muftuler laboratory (for novel diffusion imaging techniques), Andrew Nencka laboratory (for multi-slice imaging), and imaging biostatisticians.

Dr. Goveas is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine with a secondary appointment in the Institute of Health and Society. He is a fellowship-trained, board-certified Geriatric Psychiatrist. He is the Director of the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Geriatric Psychiatry Mind and Memory Clinics, and the Training Director of the ACGME-accredited Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship-Training Program.

Current Projects

Emotional reactivity and episodic memory network function and structure in depressed and nondepressed older adults with and without mild cognitive impairment.

The effects of depression and risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease on multimodal brain imaging measures in asymptomatic middle-aged (40-64 years of age) and older (65-85 years of age) adults.

The characterization of brain volumes and cerebrovascular abnormalities that distinguish depression in late life from healthy volunteers by using 7T MRI. For this project, his laboratory will also establish collaborations with the Kevin Koch laboratory (for susceptibility-weighted imaging).

Brain function and peripheral biomarkers as predictors of late-life depression in those at risk.

Information for Study Participants

1.  Late-life depression and mild cognitive impairment study

Purpose of study: The purpose of this Institutional Review Board-approved study is to determine the effects of late-life depression with or without memory loss on the brain when compared to nondepressed older adults with and without memory loss.

Please review the flyer (PDF) for more information.

2. Depression, risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease and brain imaging study

Purpose of study: This Institutional Review Board approved study is being done to examine the effects of depression and risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease on the brain in asymptomatic middle-aged (40-64 years of age) and older (65-85 years of age) adults.

Please review the flyer for more information.

3. Neurobiological markers of major depression in individuals with grief

Purpose of study: The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical, brain, and blood measurements that are associated with the development of depression in individuals who have suffered the loss of a loved one.

Please review the flyer for more information.

Peer-Reviewed Publications (selected) 

 


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