Student Life

Student Health Services

The Medical College of Wisconsin wishes to insure that all students have access to excellent high-quality health care. If your Primary Care Physician (PCP) is located at Student Health Service, you may utilize its services. The Student Health Service is located at Froedtert Hospital’s Department of Internal Medicine. Guidelines of the graduate student insurance plan must be followed to ensure the highest level of payment coverage for medical services. A clinic card is required for students and dependents which may be applied for through the Student Health Service. The Clinic card is absolutely necessary in order to obtain services.

Immunizations and necessary testing is provided and immunization records maintained in the Occupational Health Administrative Area at the Froedtert East Clinic building. These services are available only to full-time degree-seeking students.

Student Mental Health Services

The Medical College of Wisconsin recognizes that students work hard, long and responsibly. Because of the life challenges associated with professional training, the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine has devised a program to serve the needs of the students and their loved ones.
The College provides access to confidential mental health services 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Students receive five (8) free sessions of Medical College mental health services each academic year through the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine. Most major medical insurance policies should cover some of the cost after these initial eight sessions. The student Mental Health Services office is located off site for confidentiality purposes. These services are available only to full-time degree-seeking students.

Health Insurance

Health insurance coverage is required for all full-time graduate students. The Medical College offers an insurance policy currently through Humana. The annual premium for single coverage is paid by the College for all full-time students in the PhD programs. Some students are covered under health insurance policies of their parents, spouses or full-time employer and are eligible to be waived from enrollment. Students have also elected to require single coverage for dental and vision for all full-time students enrolled in the health insurance plan. Full-time degree-seeking MS, MA or MPH graduate students may purchase the student health insurance plan. Each student is responsible for payment of this coverage at registration or through stipend deduction.

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MCW Graduate School News

Online Open House for MPH & Certificate Programs

Jan. 12 - The Master of Public Health Program will host an online open house on Jan. 20, from 12 – p.m. CST. This is an opportunity to hear about our online programs and have your questions answered.

Public comment period open for Master of Public Health Program accreditation

Jan. 12 - The Master of Public Health Program at the Medical College is undergoing reaccreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). CEPH will conduct a site visit on April 6-7, 2017. The accreditation process also includes a period for the program’s stakeholders and general public to provide written comments on the program including its practices, policies, and procedures.

Summer research programs offer valuable opportunity to med, grad students

Dec. 20 - The question "What did you do on summer vacation?" could generate some very interesting responses if asked of any of the 147 undergraduate students and first-year medical students who participated in MCW's 2016 Medical Student Summer Research Program or Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR).

Enduring pain for someone she loves

Nov. 18 - Microbiology and Molecular Genetics graduate student Kristen Westdorp had run two marathons in her life prior to 2016, but the second one was more than eight years in her past, and she was ok with that. She was diving in to her graduate studies, running a casual five miles three times per week, and doing the types of things other students do to fill their time. But then her mother, Cheryl, was diagnosed with Huntington’s disease in 2014 at age 50, and, as can be expected, her perspective began to be shaped and colored by the human devastation taking place before her eyes.

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