Discovery Curriculum Teaching Toolbox

Session Planning

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   Active Learning

Active Learning is any instructional method that engages students in the learning process. Active learning is often contrasted to the traditional lecture where students passively receive information from the instructor.

Active Learning: Tips for Getting StartedActive Learning: Tips for Getting Started

Active Learning (AL) in the Classroom:

AL is any instructional method that engages students in
the learning process.
AL requires students to:

  • attend to each session prepared
  • complete meaningful learning activities
  • think about what they are doing

The core elements of active learning are student activity
and engagement in the learning process. Active learning is
often contrasted to the traditional lecture where students
passively receive information from the instructor.

Techniques:

1. Start with a question
2. Create a pre-class knowledge survey
3. Use cases related to a pre-class podcast to prompt discussion.

Benefits:

  • Students receive immediate feedback
  • Engagement is accomplished through participation--students learn by doing.
  • AL methods promote higher order thinking skills by analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating.

Resources Available:


Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

  Case-based Instruction

Information on why and how to use Case-based instruction in your session.

  Clinical Correlations

Resources related to Clinical Correlations integrated into the curriculum.

Clinical Correlations

  • The following are resources related to integrating Clinical Correlations into the curriculum.

Resources:

  • Websites:
  1. Clinical Case Studies (PDF)
  2. Clinical Cases and Images
  3. LSU Health Services/Medical Schools
  4. Case Histories in Human Physiology
  5. Northeast Ohio Medical University

Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

  ClinicalKey

ClinicalKey is an online search tool that provides faculty with Elsevier's medical and surgical content in one source.

ClinicalKeyClinicalKey

Using ClinicalKey:

ClinicalKey is an online search tool that provides faculty with Elsevier's medical and surgical content in one source.

Access to:

  • More than 900 top books and 500 journals
  • Thousands of videos
  • Millions of images

Resources Available:


Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

  Concept Mapping

A tool to offer a visual representation of how information and knowledge is organized.

Concept Mapping: Getting StartedConcept Mapping: Getting Started
 

Concept mapping - a visual representation of how information and knowledge is organized

Why use concept mapping?

  • Visualizes course material
  • Connects course concepts
  • Assesses student learning of course materials
  • Develops conceptual understanding
  • Develops problem solving skills

Process:

  1. Define the problem.
  2. Generate the ideas.
  3. Structure the ideas.
  4. Create a concept map.
  5. Interpret the concept map.
  6. Utilize the concept map.

Benefits:

  • Encourages students to brainstorm and generate new ideas
  • Assists students with knowledge integration
  • Promotes critical thinking
  • Helps correlate the process of linking information to practice
  • Fosters pattern recognition
  • Encourages students to work collaboratively in groups

Resources Available:


Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

  Crediting External Sources

Give credit to the author for the images, ideas or quotations that you use, and to enable students to locate the original document or eResource if they would like to pursue additional information.

Using External Sources in Lectures and HandoutsCrediting External Sources

The purpose of citing sources is to give credit to the author for the images, ideas or quotations that you use, and to enable students to locate the original document or eResource if they would like to pursue additional information.

Examples of APA styles and formats include many of the most common types of sources used in academic teaching and research. For additional examples and more detailed information about APA citation style, refer to the Citation Guide handout above or the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

  1. Cite this for me
  2. EasyBib


Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

  Instructional Methods

Instructional Methods including Case-Based Discussion, Concept Mapping, Demonstration, Independent Learning, Preceptorship, Problem-based Learning (PBL), Simulation, Team-based Learning (TBL).

  Introducing MedBiquitous Terms MedBiquitous Terms are a standard set of key terms governed by the AAMC used to classify instruction, assessment, and resource types used in medical and healthcare education.
  Large Classroom Setting

Tips to help minimize start-up time and transition time between small and large group activities.

  M2 Session Requirements

Requirements for M2 sessions including recommended length of session, pre-work recommendations and session content due dates.

  PowerPoint Best Practices

Best practices for using PowerPoint presentation software in the classroom.

 

PowerPoint: Best PracticesPowerPoint Best Practices

PowerPoint Classroom Presentation:

The following are best practices for using PowerPoint presentations in the classroom.

Formatting:

  • Use San-serif fonts (Arial, Helvetica, Calibri, etc.).
  • Use readable font sizes (32 for 5-7 bullets) viewable from front and back rows.
  • Use white background.
  • Aim for 5-7 bullets per slide.
  • Maintain white space in margins for note-taking.
  • Integrate images into slides.

Advantages:

  • Create colorful, attractive designs with templates.
  • Quickly reorder slides with easy drag and drop feature in Slide Sorter view.
  • Advance slides with one key stroke.
  • Integrate audio clips, animation and video.

Techniques:

  • Add an embedded video into the presentation.
  • Captivate audiences with transitions or animations.
  • Integrate data from other applications such as, an Excel graph, Word table, etc.
  • Use the Notes feature to write a script.

Benefits:

  • Students receive immediate feedback
  • Engagement is accomplished through participation--students learn by doing.
  • AL methods promote higher order thinking skills by analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating.

Resources Available:

  1. How to Use PowerPoint 2010
  2. How to Design an Effective Presentation
  3. Death by PowerPoint
  • Websites:
  1. Getting Started with PowerPoint


Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

  Preparing Class Materials

Information on best use of resources to support teaching and learning.

  Session Planning Document

A guide for planning a session.

  Social Media

Social media are primarily Internet-based tools for sharing and discussing information among human beings. The term most often refers to activities that integrate technology, social interaction, and the construction of words, pictures, videos and audio.

Active Learning: Using Social MediaActive Learning: Using Social Media

Social media are primarily Internet-based tools for sharing and discussing information among human beings. The term most often refers to activities that integrate technology, social interaction, and the construction of words, pictures, videos and audio. This interaction, and the manner in which information is presented, depends on the varied perspectives and “building” of shared meaning among communities, as people share their stories and experiences. ~Wikipedia    

                                                          
Yammer was launched in 2008 as an enterprise social network; MCW has its own private site with secure, online space to foster professional communication among college, students, faculty and staff.
Course-related files can be uploaded and made available to the students in a specific group.

Using Yammer:

  • You will receive an invitation to join
  • Then create your profile—it helps to add your photo
  • Add Yammer App to your mobile device and/or desktop
  • Add course-related announcements or reminders or a topic to your posts to take advantage of the SEARCH feature and stay organized
  • Communications referred to as “yams”.
  • Your Yammer followers are similar to Facebook “friends”.

Benefits of this method:

  • Encourages collaboration
  • Accelerates informal learning
  • Provides social platform to share files, notes and comments
  • Used with Groups as public (all MCW) or private (only your course participants)
  • Use private groups to easily facilitate course discussions
  • Allows users to follow people
  • Create messages that can be read in seven seconds or less (think short!)
  • Already a comfortable tool

Websites:

Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

  Team-based Learning

The main features of the team-based learning approach are (1) permanent (term-long) and instructor-assigned groups of 5-7 students with diverse skill sets and backgrounds, (2) Individual accountability for out-of-class work such as reading and preliminary homework, (3) incentive for working effectively together as a team by giving significant credit (course points) for team activities, (4)in class application exercises that are significant and about making a decision – providing a simple answer – based on complex analysis of data or application of course principles.

Team-based Learning (TBL)Team-based Learning (TBL)

TBL in the Classroom

  • Spend some quality time upfront orienting the students to this process; it is very different from other approaches to teaching
  • Set expectations : establish the grading weights for individual/group/peer contributions
  • Be sure to manage the physical space in the room you use for TBL; create a comfortable environment for group interaction
  • Use the Audience Response System (ARS) to display your iRAT and/or gRAT as well as the record of the results

Basic TBL Process

  1. Create Course Objectives
  2. Select pre-class work
  3. Lead Readiness Assurance Process (RAP)
  • Pre-class Work- Reading
  • iRAT
  • gRAT
  • Post RAT lecture

    4. Open Application Exercise

  • Significant
  • Same
  • Single Answer
  • Simultaneous sharing

Benefits of TBL

  • Course objectives become applying and integrating the content rather than knowing the content
  • Students move from passive to active and accountable learning
  • Students receive frequent and timely feedback
  • TBL enhances student problem-solving skills and promotes teamwork
  • TBL replaces or reduces lecture time

Resources Available

  1. Planning Worksheet (PDF)

  2. Student Orientation to TBL

  3. Grading Guidelines

  4. Application Exercise

  5. Peer Evaluation

  • Websites

  1. Team-Based Learning Collaborative

  2. Duke University School of Medicine TBL (Video)


Need Help? Contact Diane Wilke-Zemanovic, Sue Korek, or Diane Brown at CurriculumDesign@mcw.edu.

 

Page Updated 05/18/2016