Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine

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Clinical Research

As an academic institution, the Pulmonary & Critical Care department is able to offer opportunities to participate in a variety of clinical trials.   MCW faculty are engaged in a variety of clinical research trials conducted in collaboration with research networks and industry sponsored-trials.

 

What Are Clinical Trials and Why do People Participate?

Clinical trials are part of clinical research and at the heart of all medical advances. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease.
Treatments might be new drugs or new combinations of drugs, new surgical procedures or devices, or new ways to use existing treatments.
The goal of clinical trials is to determine if a new test or treatment works and is safe. Clinical trials can also look at other aspects of care, such as improving the quality of life for people with chronic illnesses.
People participate in clinical trials for a variety of reasons. Healthy volunteers say they participate to help others and to contribute to moving science forward. Participants with an illness or disease also participate to help others, but also to possibly receive the newest treatment and to have the additional care and attention from the clinical trial staff.
Clinical trials offer hope for many people and an opportunity to help researchers find better treatments for others in the future.
The Basics. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.nih.gov

 

Ongoing Clinical Trials in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Ongoing clinical and translational research studies in the Division focus on improving outcomes and quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis, improving outcomes in critically ill patients with direct acute lung injury, developing new approaches to pulmonary arterial hypertension, and improving smoking cessation rates in the greater Milwaukee area.

Current pharmaceutical trials include the areas of cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease.  The cystic fibrosis clinical studies are aimed at improving airway hydration and breathing, reducing infections and inflammation, increasing weight thereby increasing quality of life and perhaps survival time.  Our pulmonary arterial hypertension program conducts studies to extend survival and an in-process study for individuals with ILD/IPF looks at a potential medication’s likelihood of becoming standard of care with the same aim.  We have also recently completed a study for critically ill patients with direct acute lung injury that aims to improve time to end of assisted breathing and survival time. 

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Page Updated 11/10/2014