Biochemistry

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Spring 2014 Course Offerings

 

 Course
Number

 Course Name

 No.
of
Credits

 Instructor
Name(s)

 Days

 Times

 Location

02276A

 
Special Topics in Biochemistry - Oxidative Stress Signaling in Cancer

1

Jong-In Park, PhD

Mon. &

Thurs.

Feb 17 - Mar 28

10:30 am

to

12:00 pm

BSB 376

02248A Structural Basis - Macromolecules 1      Jianhua Fu, PhD

Mon. &

Thurs.

Mar 31 - May 9

10:30 am

to

12:00 pm

BSB 376

 

Spring 2014 Courses

Special Topics in Biochemistry - Oxidative Stress Signaling in Cancer
 
This course will focus on the role of oxidant-activated signaling cascades in neoplastic transformation.  Major areas to be covered include: (a) reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS, RNS) as second messengers; (b) metabolic vs. non-metabolic ROS/RNS sources; (c) cellular targets of oxidative attack; (d) preventative and reparative antioxidant defenses; (e) activation and regulation of redox signaling cascades; (f) proliferative vs. apoptotic signaling under oxidative pressure; (g) dysregulated redox metabolism in cancer and (h) signaling events in oxidant-based tumor therapies. Students are expected to develop an advanced understanding of various aspects of oxidative stress signaling in tumorigenesis through introductory lectures, outside readings, and in-class discussions.
 
Structural Basis - Macromolecules
 
Biochemical functions of macromolecules are dependent on the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of such molecules.  The determination of 3-D structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes is therefore a necessary step in understanding mechanisms of any biomolecular system.  X-ray crystallography is the main method for 3-D structure determination, capable of either low (e.g. subdomain) or high (atomic) resolution analysis.  This course teaches the working knowledge necessary for carrying out X-ray diffraction experiments, and uses hands-on exercises as the main format.  Students will crystallize a well-known protein, collect X-ray data and by using contemporary computer programs, process the data to obtain the structure of the protein. There are no pre-requisite courses required. Registered students will be expected to pre-read Outline of Crystallography for Biologists (au. David Blow ISBN 0198510519)  in advance of the first class meeting. The number of students will be limited to six.
 
 
 

Contact Information

Medical College of Wisconsin
Dept. of Biochemistry
8701 Watertown Plank Rd.
Milwaukee, WI 53226
Phone: 414-955-8435
Fax: 414-955-6510
biochemdept@mcw.edu

webmaster@mcw.edu
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Page Updated 08/12/2014