Biochemistry

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                   Spring 2014 Course Offerings 

 

 Course
Number

 Course Name

 No.
of
Credits

 Instructor
Name(s)

 Days

 Times

 Location

02276A

 
Special Topics in Biochemistry - Oxidative Stress Signaling in Cancer

1

Jong-In Park, PhD

Mon. &

Thurs.

Feb 17 - Mar 28

10:30 am

to

12:00 pm

BSB 376

02248A Structural Basis - Macromolecules 1      Jianhua Fu, PhD

Mon. &

Thurs.

Mar 31 - May 9

10:30 am

to

12:00 pm

BSB 376

 

Spring 2014 Courses

Special Topics in Biochemistry - Oxidative Stress Signaling in Cancer
 
This course will focus on the role of oxidant-activated signaling cascades in neoplastic transformation.  Major areas to be covered include: (a) reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS, RNS) as second messengers; (b) metabolic vs. non-metabolic ROS/RNS sources; (c) cellular targets of oxidative attack; (d) preventative and reparative antioxidant defenses; (e) activation and regulation of redox signaling cascades; (f) proliferative vs. apoptotic signaling under oxidative pressure; (g) dysregulated redox metabolism in cancer and (h) signaling events in oxidant-based tumor therapies. Students are expected to develop an advanced understanding of various aspects of oxidative stress signaling in tumorigenesis through introductory lectures, outside readings, and in-class discussions.
 
Structural Basis - Macromolecules
 
Biochemical functions of macromolecules are dependent on the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of such molecules.  The determination of 3-D structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes is therefore a necessary step in understanding mechanisms of any biomolecular system.  X-ray crystallography is the main method for 3-D structure determination, capable of either low (e.g. subdomain) or high (atomic) resolution analysis.  This course teaches the working knowledge necessary for carrying out X-ray diffraction experiments, and uses hands-on exercises as the main format.  Students will crystallize a well-known protein, collect X-ray data and by using contemporary computer programs, process the data to obtain the structure of the protein. There are no pre-requisite courses required. Registered students will be expected to pre-read Outline of Crystallography for Biologists (au. David Blow ISBN 0198510519)  in advance of the first class meeting. The number of students will be limited to six.
 
 
 
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