Epidemiology Data Resource Center

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General Health and Nutrition

Demographic Health Survey (DHS)

DHS population-based surveys provide reliable and accurate information on HIV, malaria, gender, family planning, maternal and child health, and nutrition in more than 90 countries. They offer statistics on the most common indicators, as well as trends and cross-country comparisons. Since 1984 more than 220 surveys have been carried out in more than 90 countries. The survey reports and survey data are free to everyone.

Health, United States

Health, United States presents national trends in health statistics on such topics as birth and death rates, infant mortality, life expectancy, morbidity and health status, risk factors, use of ambulatory and inpatient care, health personnel and facilities, financing of health care, health insurance and managed care, and other health topics.

Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES)

The HHANES is a nationwide probability survey designed to produce estimates of the health of Hispanics in general, and specifically of Puerto Ricans, Mexican Americans, and Cuban Americans. The HHANES is organized into files based on subject matter. The following files are available through the EDSC: adolescent and adult history questionnaire, alcohol consumption, blood and urine assessments, body measurements, child history questionnaire, dental health, diabetes and oral glucose tolerance test, dietary practices and nutrient intake, drug abuse, gallbladder ultrasound, hearing, electrocardiogram, depression, pesticide data, physician's examination, vision, and 24-hour recall.

KIDS COUNT

KIDS COUNT is a national and state-by-state effort to track the well-being of children in the United States. By providing high-quality data and trend analysis, KIDS COUNT seeks to enrich local, state, and national discussions concerning ways to secure better futures for all children — and to raise the visibility of children's issues through a nonpartisan, evidence-based lens.

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

Beginning in 1999, the NHANES became a continuous, annual survey rather than the periodic survey that it had been in the past. In addition to the analysis of data from any two-year cycle, it is possible to combine two or more cycles (e.g. 1999-00 and 2001-02), provided the data items of interest in all combined years are comparable in wording and methods. Population target groups vary for topics within and between NHANES questionnaire sections. Many of the NHANES 1999-2000 questions were previously asked in NHANES II and III and HHANES. Some of the 60+ topics covered by the NHANES 1999-2000 include oral health, blood pressure, blood cholesterol, HIV, and dietary intake. There are 40+ topics addressed by the NHANES 2001-2002, including blood pressure, diabetes, STIs, diet behavior and nutrition, and immunizations.

National Health Examination Survey (NHES), Cycle I

The first round in a series of such surveys, the NHES consists of information on a range of health topics, collected through interviews and physical exams. The NHES was conducted on a nationwide probability sample weighted to reflect the U.S. noninstitutionalized civilian population at the midpoint of the survey. The NHES is organized into files based on subject matter. The following files are available through the EDSC: demographic characteristics, dental findings, diabetes, cardiovascular, physical measurements, psychological distress, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and vision.

National Health Examination Survey (NHES), Cycle II

The NHES consists of information on a range of health topics, collected through interviews and physical exams. The second round of the NHES was conducted on a nationwide probability sample weighted to reflect the U.S. noninstitutionalized child population at the time of the survey in terms of age, sex, and certain other demographic characteristics. The NHES is organized into files based on subject matter. The following files are available through the EDSC: responses to detailed questionnaires for medical and developmental histories (completed by a household adult); responses to school questionnaires; medical, dental, and psychological examinations; vision and hearing tests; and anthropometric measurements.

National Health Examination Survey (NHES), Cycle III

The NHES consists of information on a range of health topics, collected through interviews and physical exams. The third round of the NHES was conducted on a nationwide probability sample weighted to reflect the U.S. noninstitutionalized youth population at the time of the survey in terms of age, sex, and certain other demographic characteristics. Nearly one-third of the children examined in NHES cycle II were also examined in this data set. It is possible to identify sample persons examined in both surveys to create a composite data set for longitudinal studies. The following NHES files are available through the EDSC: responses to detailed questionnaires for medical and developmental histories (completed by a household adult); responses to school questionnaires; medical, dental, and psychological examinations; vision and hearing tests; anthropometric measurements; and certain x-ray and laboratory tests.

National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

Produced annually, the NHIS is a continuing nationwide survey conducted in households. It includes a "core" set of questions on health-related variables which generally change little from year to year, and supplements which can vary yearly. The NHIS core is organized into household, person, doctor visit, hospital stay, and condition files and includes demographics as well as such items as type of living quarters, size of family, work-loss days, school-loss days, limitation of activity, injuries, place and date of doctor visit, type of doctor seen, hospital admission and discharge dates, hospital ownership, type of service, and type of condition. The NHIS supplements have covered such topics as immunization, AIDS, disability, access to care, health insurance, environmental health, hearing, diabetes, pregnancy and smoking, cancer, dental care, and eye care.

National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Multiple Cause-of-Death Public Use Data File

Contains supplementary information for the 1986 through 2004 NHIS. Linkage information was collected of NHIS respondents 18 years old and older to allow for matching to the National Death Index (NDI). Linkage of the NHIS respondents with the NDI provides a longitudinal component to the NHIS that allows for ascertainment of vital status. The addition of vital status permits the use of NHIS data for survival analyses, mortality rates, and life expectancy while using the richness of the NHIS questionnaires as covariates. Information contained in this database includes cause-of-death codes, NCHS cause recodes, and entity-axis and record-axis multiple causes-of-death codes.

National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) State Data Files

The NHIS State Data Files cover the same information as the NHIS, but with the addition of state identifiers. In order to protect respondent confidentiality while providing the data at this level of geography, NCHS added statistical noise at both the record and variable levels.

National Health Interview Survey on Disability (NHIS-D), Phase I and II

The NHIS-D was designed to collect data that can be used to understand disability, to develop public health policy, to produce simple prevalence estimates of selected health conditions, and to provide descriptive baseline statistics on the effects of disabilities. The NHIS-D is not limited to one definition of disability. Data items in this database include sensory, communication, and mobility problems; health conditions; activities of daily living; functional limitations; mental health; services and benefits; special health needs of children; early child development; education; relationship to respondent; and perceived disability.

National Longitudinal Survey (NLSY)

The National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) are a set of surveys designed to gather information at multiple points in time on the labor market activities and other significant life events of several groups of men and women. For more than 4 decades, NLS data have served as an important tool for economists, sociologists, and other researchers.

National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs

The National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) is a national survey that was conducted by telephone in English and Spanish for the first time in 2001. The survey was conducted a second time in 2005-2006 and for a third time in 2009-2010. The survey provides a broad range of information about the health and functional status of children with special health care needs collected in a manner that allows for comparisons between states and at the national level. Telephone numbers are called at random to identify households with one or more children under 18 years old. Each child in the household is screened for special health care needs using the CSHCN Screener. In each household, one child was randomly selected to be the subject of the interview. The survey results are weighted to represent the population of non-institutionalized children with special health care needs 0-17 nationally and in each of the 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

National Survey of Children’s Health

The National Survey of Children's Health is a national survey that was conducted by telephone in English and Spanish for the first time in 2003-2004. A second survey was fielded in 2007-2008 and the survey is being conducted for a third time in 2011. The survey provides a broad range of information about children's health and well-being collected in a manner that allows for comparisons between states and at the national level. Telephone numbers are called at random to identify households with one or more children under 18 years old. In each household, one child was randomly selected to be the subject of the interview. The survey results are weighted to represent the population of non-institutionalized children 0-17 nationally and in each of the 50 states plus the District of Columbia.

National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), 2006 - 2010

The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by NCHS, in collaboration with several other federal agencies. The NSFG has been conducted 7 times since 1973. The purpose of the survey is to produce national estimates of: 1) factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility; 2) the medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth; 3) factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption; 4) adoption and caring for nonbiological children; 5) father involvement behaviors; and 6) men’s and women’s attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage.

National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), Cycle 6

For each round of data collection, national samples of men and women 15-44 years of age were interviewed in person in their own homes. Analysis can be done for the four major census regions (northeast, midwest, south, and west) and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The NSFG contains information on demographics, sexual activity, contraception, family planning, pregnancy, birth expectations, adoption, and health history, among others. See also NSFG, Cycles 1-5.

National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), Cycle IV 1990 Telephone Re-Interview

This database contains maternal and child health information collected by telephone interview from women between the ages of 15 and 44. The majority of these women were interviewed in person in 1998 as part of the NSFG, Cycle IV; however, a number of first-time interviews were conducted for women between the ages of 15 and 17, who had turned 15 in the two and a half years since the 1988 interview. The NSFG contains information on demographics, sexual activity, contraception, family planning, pregnancy, adoption, health history, and AIDS knowledge.

National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), Cycles 1-5

The 1973-1995 National Surveys of Family Growth contain maternal and child health information. For each round of data collection, national samples of women 15-44 years of age were interviewed in person in their own homes. Analysis can be done for the four major census regions (northeast, midwest, south, and west) and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The NSFG contains information on demographics, sexual activity, contraception, family planning, pregnancy, adoption, health history, and AIDS knowledge.

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Health Data

OECD Health Data provides internationally comparable data on the health care systems of OECD's 30 member countries. It includes historic data, with some time series available back to 1960, and contains information on life expectancy, potential life years lost, premature mortality, perceived health status, medical facilities, health employment, trade in health goods and services, expenditures, environment, nutrition, discharge rate, length of stay, surgical procedures, demographics, education, and economy.

School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS)

The SHPPS is a national survey designed to collect information on school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels for elementary, middle/junior high, and senior high schools. The SHPPS contains data describing eight school health program components: health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, food service, school policy and environment, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement.

State of Aging and Health Report

The State of Aging and Health in America report assesses the health status and health behaviors of U.S. adults aged 65 years and older and makes recommendations to improve the mental and physical health of all Americans in their later years. The report includes national- and state-based report cards that examine 15 key indicators of older adult health, Calls to Action which recommend strategies to improve the health and quality of life of older adults, and state examples that highlight innovative healthy aging efforts at the state and community level.

Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW)

The Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW) is the first statewide research survey of its kind to measure information on critical health conditions in Wisconsin. Findings from SHOW present a comprehensive picture of the health of Wisconsin residents, helping to identify needs and target resources where they are most needed.

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