Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

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Public Health

Degree Offered
Master of Public Health (MPH)

Also offered - Graduate Certificate in Public Health


Program Admissions Requirements
In addition to the general Graduate School admission requirements, this program has additional specific requirements.

Applicants must satisfy the following requirements for admission:Study Group

  • A personal statement stating why the applicant wishes to pursue this degree.
     
  • Three letters of recommendation. If employed, at least one of the letters should be from the applicant’s employer or manager.
     
  • Applicants must submit official GRE scores.
     
  • Basic computer competency.
     
  • Applicants with insufficient background or training in public health or other health and biological sciences may be required to take prerequisite courses.


Program Description
This online program allows students to pursue graduate coursework without being present on campus. It provides flexible learning opportunities through distance technology and interactive methods. A minimum of 42 credits are required for graduation. Students may choose full or part-time study but should plan to complete the Program within 5 years. The curriculum consists of five core courses, one ethics course, three community health courses, three elective courses, a field placement experience and a Capstone Project. Assignments require the application of theoretical concepts to practical situations through case analysis and experiential activities. A Certificate in Public Health is available for students who wish to complete only the five core courses.
 



Required Courses

Core
18200  Environmental Health
18201  Principles of Epidemiology
18203  Public Health Administration
18204  Introduction to Biostatistics
18212  Behavioral Science and Public Health

Ethics
18250  Balancing Harms and Individual and Community Interests: Ethical Issues in Public Health

Community Health
18209  Community Health Assessment and Improvement
18230  Community Health Program Planning
18260  Community Health Program Evaluation

Culminating Experiences
18280  Field Placement
18297  Capstone Project


Courses

18200 Environmental Health. 3 credits. Recommended: Undergraduate chemistry and biology; 18201 Principles of Epidemiology.
Provides a foundation for understanding the scientific principles of environmental analysis, including communicable diseases, toxic chemicals and hazardous physical conditions as well as the development of environmental legislation.

18201 Principles of Epidemiology. 3 credits.
Examines the design and implementation of case control, cohort, and mortality studies; identifies resources, databases, and problems; and critically analyzes studies in current public health literature.

18202 Toxicology. 3 credits. Prerequisites: 18201 Principles of Epidemiology and 18204 Introduction to Biostatistics. Organic chemistry recommended.
Provides an in-depth assessment of the literature and conditions of exposure to potentially toxic substances as well as clinical and industrial management of such substances.

18203 Public Health Administration. 3 credits.
Provides an introduction to the structure, functions and financing of public health within the context of the U.S. health care system and its health policies, and to the planning, management and evaluation of programs to improve health.

18204 Introduction to Biostatistics. 3 credits.
Describes the use of descriptive and analytical statistics in research studies, with an emphasis on understanding statistical reports and judging the appropriateness of statistical applications reported in the literature. Calculations of statistics are included as a means to understand the appropriate use of statistics.

18205 Practice of Occupational Health and Medicine. 3 credits. Recommended: 18200 Environmental Health, 18201 Principles of Epidemiology, 18203 Public Health Administration, 18204 Biostatistics, and 18212 Behavioral Science and Public Health.
Provides an introduction to practice in this specialty area with specific education on the key content areas in occupational health. Students will acquire new knowledge, skills, and attitudes as they approach occupational health issues and problems in the future.

18206 Practice of Public Health. 3 credits. Recommended: 18200 Environmental Health, 18201 Principles of Epidemiology, and 18203 Public Health Administration.
Concentrates on public health principles as they apply to the practice of public health; community aspects of employee health; resources for contemporary public health issues.

18208 Health Care Management: Finance. 3 credits.
Introduces the field of financial management and examines how funds are acquired, structured, protected, and used to assure an organization’s survival and to incorporate advances in health care technology and practice; emphasizes the concepts of managerial finance in the context of the U.S. health care industry.

18209 Community Health Assessment and Improvement. 3 credits. Recommended: 18203 Public Health Administration and 18212 Behavioral Science and Public Health.
Covers the central concepts of community health assessment and improvement. Students will review public health concepts from public health systems and practice perspective. The course will focus on public health essential services 1 and 2. Students will obtain an understanding of the public health system, community health assessment and the health improvement process using selected frameworks. The course will focus in-depth on learning about the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) framework and application of selected components to course projects.

18212 Behavioral Science and Public Health. 3 credits.
Surveys the influence of biological factors, family, state of development, ethnic and cultural factors, community influences and stressors affecting health and well-being.

18213 Clinical Prevention. 3 credits.
Prepares health care professionals to interpret and update clinical preventive services guidelines and to judiciously put them into practice. This goal is pursued by thorough review of the methodology and guidelines of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), the Put Prevention into Practice Handbook (PPIP), and selected readings from websites and journals. Activity assignments provide application of the methodology and guidelines into practice.

18214 Organizational Behavior and Design. 3 credits.
Emphasizes how individual and group behaviors influence and are influenced by leadership, politics, power, communication patterns, stress and an organization’s design; conflict management and negotiation skills as skills for the health care executive and provides cases, examples, and exercises to highlight organizational issues and develop students’ insight in key areas.

18215 Infectious Diseases. 3 credits.
Emphasizes the practice of public health in the area of infectious diseases: surveillance, outbreak investigation and control, and prevention and policy.

18218 Racial and Ethnic Inequalities in Health. 3 credits. Recommended: 18201 Principles of Epidemiology and 18204 Introduction to Biostatistics.
Provides an in-depth introduction to health disparities and underlying determinants of population health. The course will help clinicians and other public health students and professionals develop and strengthen their knowledge, skills and ability to critically examine issues of health disparities and to develop a better understanding of some of the underlying social determinants of health disparities, from a multidisciplinary perspective. The ultimate goal of the course is to help students develop the skills needed to apply knowledge and theory of health disparities in designing health services and epidemiological studies and interventions to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities.

18220 Occupational Health Law. 3 credits.
Examines the basic legal knowledge required by an occupational health professional including worker’s compensation laws; laws/regulations governing occupational safety and health; environmental laws/regulations; food, drug, device, and cosmetic laws/regulations; medical malpractice and the malpractice system.

18221 Public Health Law. 3 credits.
Examines the basic legal knowledge a public health professional should have including worker’s compensation laws; laws/regulations governing public health safety and health; environmental laws/regulations; food, drug, device, and cosmetic laws/regulations; and medical malpractice and the medical malpractice system, including legal sources of public health powers, the administrative law system, public health law as it relates to individual rights, control of property, substance abuse, and the AIDS epidemic.

18222 Health Care Law. 3 credits.
Emphasizes the need for knowledge of the law to comprehend the relationships, particularly the rights and responsibilities among the patient, the patient’s family, the physician, the health care institution, and other interested third parties. This course not only investigates these relationships and the conflicts that arise in the decision making, but also identifies the impact of public policy and technology on these relationships. This course will introduce you to the basis of health care law as well as to the changing nature of the law. This is necessary due to the increasing influence of the law on health care institutions and its professionals.

18230 Community Health Program Planning. 3 credits. Recommended: 18203 Public Health Administration and 18209 Community Health Assessment and Improvement.
Builds on the foundation in health improvement program planning obtained in the Public Health Administration and Community Assessment and Improvement courses. This course will increase the depth and breadth of students’ knowledge and skills through a theoretical and application-based curriculum through three modules, including strategic planning, program planning, and leadership competencies to lead planning efforts.

18250 Balancing Harms and Individual and Community Interests: Ethical Issues in Public Health. 3 credits.
Provides students with an introduction to the moral, social and ethical issues involved in public health policy and practice. The course begins by examining the moral, social and political philosophical foundations of public health, particularly the role of the state and of individual autonomy in shaping behaviors. The course then examines several areas of public health policy and practice in the context of this moral and social framework. These include mandatory childhood vaccination programs; health screening; use of personal health information; racial and gender disparities in healthcare; and access to healthcare/health insurance. Special attention is paid to how consideration of the moral and social framework will place limits on, and shape, public health intervention.

18254 Challenges in Maternal and Child Health. 3 credits.
Provides students with an in-depth introduction to the underlying health challenges as they pertain to women, children and youth. The ultimate goal of the course is to help students develop a broad understanding about the factors that shape the health of populations and to equip them with evaluative tools for determining how health system shortfalls might be effectively addressed. The course will assist clinicians and other public health students and professionals to develop and strengthen their knowledge, skills, and ability to critically examine maternal child health issues and to develop a better understanding of some of the underlying determinants of health.

18258 Advanced Epidemiological Methods. 3 credits.
Builds on introductory epidemiology courses by providing a more in-depth understanding of fundamental epidemiologic principles presented in introductory epidemiologic courses such as study design and bias. In addition Epidemiological Methods emphasizes more advanced concepts needed in establishing causal relationships from observational data. It is particularly relevant to students who intend to conduct studies investigating the occurrence and determinants of diseases or who wish to be sophisticated consumers or critics of epidemiologic research conducted by others. The course emphasizes practical application of epidemiological methods to real-world problems.

18260 Community Health Program Evaluation. 3 credits. Prerequisites: 18201 Principles of Epidemiology, 18203 Public Health Administration, and 18204 Introduction to Biostatistics.
Prepares students to apply public health knowledge and skills in a community-based setting. Evaluation skills are an essential competency of both public health practitioners and public health administrators and thus are a critical component of the MPH curriculum. Building on the foundation in research methods and data analysis obtained in the Epidemiology and Biostatistics courses and program planning and management obtained in the Public Health Administration course, this course will increase the depth and breadth of students’ knowledge and skills through a theoretical and application-based curriculum through four modules, including the foundation of program evaluation, the five levels of the program evaluation hierarchy, program evaluation tools, and program evaluation and public health practice.

18279 Field Placement Preparation. 1 credit.  Prerequisites:  18200 Environmental Health, 18201 Principles of Epidemiology, 18203 Public Health Administration, 18204 Introduction to Biostatistics, 18212 Behavioral Science and Public Health required; all coursework in the Master of Public Health program besides 18297 MPH Capstone Project recommended.
This course provides the foundation for the MPH Field Placement course, a required culminating experience within the MPH program.  In the Preparation course, students will connect with public health organizations and arrange their specific Field Placement project.  The course will highlight principles of human subject research as well as community-academic partnerships and will help students apply these principles in the development of their project.

18280 Field Placement. 2-4 credits. Prerequisites: 18200 Environmental Health, 18201 Principles of Epidemiology, 18203 Public Health Administration, 18204 Biostatistics, and 18212 Behavioral Science and Public Health.
Consists of a planned, supervised and evaluated practice experience that is designed to enhance and complement the student’s educational training by providing practical experience in public or private organizations that address significant public health issues. Working with a site preceptor and faculty advisor, the student will complete an Action Learning Project that is relevant to his/her area of interest.

18295 Reading and Research. 1-9 credits.
An independent study course, under public health faculty guidance, to pursue reading and research in an area of specific student interest.

18297 Capstone Project. 1-3 credits. Prerequisites: All other MPH coursework.
Provides a culminating experience that requires the student to synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences. Students apply theory and public health principles in the development of a Master’s paper on significant public or community health issue or topic.
 

Contact Information

Graduate School of
Biomedical Sciences
8701 Watertown Plank Rd.
Milwaukee, WI 53226

Phone: 414-955-8218
Fax: 414-955-6555
gradschool@mcw.edu

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