Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

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Name: Cherisse L. Hall, PhD 

 

Hometown:  May Pen, Jamaica

 

Undergraduate Institution and Major: Biochemistry, Lawrence University, Appleton WI.

 

Departmental Program and Lab:

I am a recent graduate from the Medical College of Wisconsin 2014.  I worked in Dr. Christopher Kristich’s Lab in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics

 

Brief description of researchEnterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive bacterium that resides in the gut of many animals. It also exhibits intrinsic resistance to antibiotics of the cephalosporin family that target cell wall biosynthesis. My research focuses on a unraveling a novel signaling pathway in the bacteria that is thought to be activated in response to cephalosporins to mediate its intrinsic resistance. 

 

Publications, abstracts or titles of posters or seminars you have presented:

Research in progress seminar- (yearly departmental requirement):

Unraveling PKC-mediated cephalosporin resistance in Enterococcus faecalis: Enzyme characterization and Role of IreB  (April 2011)

Signal transduction and antibiotic resistance in Enterococcus faecalis (June 2010)

The 2011 Madison Molecular Genetics of Bacteria and Phage Meeting-

Cherisse L Hall, Shama Mirza, Christopher J Kristich: Understanding Cephalosporin Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis- Characterization of a Ser/Thr Kinase and Phosphatase. (Poster)

Publications

Zhao, M., Barron, M. R., Zhixin, L., Koprowski, S., Hall C. L. and Lough J. Making Stem Cells Infarct Avid. Cell Transplant 19, 245-250 (2010)

Larson, M., Zhixin L., Hall, C. L., Jensen, E., McAllister, D.M., Kalyanaraman, B. and Zhao, M.  Physiological Fluctuation of 99mTc-Sestamibi Uptake in Normal Mammary Glands: A Systematic Investigation in Female Rats. Acta Radiol 50, 975–978 (2009).

Chen, S., Hall, C. & Barbieri, J.T. Substrate recognition of VAMP-2 by botulinum neurotoxin B and tetanus neurotoxin. Journal of Biological Chemistry 283, 21153–21159 (2008).

 

Career plans/goals after MCW:  Research in an academic or industrial setting

 

What does diversity mean to you? What has been your experience as an under-represented minority in Biomedical research?

Diversity brings to any table an enrichment of ideas, opinions and values that originate from individuals of different racial and cultural backgrounds and with it there is a sense of harmony as everyone works as one unit towards one goal.  As a URM at MCW, I feel I now have the tremendous support from my peers that every graduate student needs as they complete the rigorous and at times stressful work towards the PhD.

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