The Bobbie Nick Voss Laboratory

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Posters

This poster was presented by Luke Drury at Digestive Disease Week May 2011 in Chicago, IL.  These data show for the first time how oligomerization of the chemokine, CXCL12, elicits distinct responses to regulate intestinal epithelial cell migration.

 

This poster was presented by Kimberle Agle at the April 2011 Experimental Biology meeting in Washington DC.  This new data demonstrates that chemokine stimulation leads to activation of integrins specific for the ECM protein laminin.  These findings provide evidence for how the chemokine stimulation leads to enhanced wound repair.  (Note: Image quality reduced for web consumption.)

CXCL12 stimulation leads to dynamic activation of laminin specific integrins

 

This poster was presented by Noah Zimmerman

cAMP Aborgates Intestinal Epithelial Restitution

 

This poster presentation was made by Luke Drury at the 2009 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Denver, CO.  The new finding of this work is the demonstration that a chemokine protein secreted by colon cancer cells could increase the rate of detachment-induced cell death, a process called anoikis.  These findings are important as cancer cells, especially from metastatic tumors, are typically thought to survive anoikis.

Re-establishment of CXCL12 Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Regulates Anoikis through Bim-mediated Intrinsic Apoptosis Luke Drury and Michael B Dwinell

 

This poster presentation was made by Dr Noah Zimmerman at the 2009 annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association in Chicago, IL.  This work is the first time we have shown that changing the expression of chemokine receptors in vivo disrupts key signaling pathways the gut uses to repair wounds.

 

This work was presented by Dr Dwinell at a focused meeting on epithelial injury repair.  The key findings of this work is the demonstration that the ERK1/2 signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating epithelial homeostasis.  As metastatic tumors typically survive detachment-induced cell death, what is called anoikis, suggesting an approach for therapeutic intervention of tumor cell migration.

 

This poster was presented by Mike Wendt at a Keystone Symposium in Lake Louise, BC, Canada.  The new results from this work were the determination that "turning off" expression of the chemokine CXCL12 results in metastasis of human breast cancer cells.  These findings mirror our prior report in colon cancer, suggesting that silencing of the chemokine is a key step in the progression to metastatic cancers.

 

This poster presentation was made by Beccy Vongsa (nee Moyer) at the 2006 meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association in Los Angles, CA.  With this work we established that the inherent ability of intestinal epithelial cells to migrate and cover a wound can be significantly improved by a chemokine protein, CXCL12.  These findings are important as chemokines are ever present in human immune disorders and can be a potential target for therapy to improve injury repair.

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