A Typical Day

Med-Peds residents transition between internal medicine and pediatric rotations every 4 months, which provides optimal time in the specialty and also allows the residents to experience seasonal changes that occur in certain disease patterns. Rotations are structured such that each experience builds on the last one.

Intern on Pediatrics (on wards)

Shannon Muray, MDShannon Murray, MD

PGY-1, University of Wisconsin-Madison

6 a.m.: I arrive at the hospital at 6 a.m. I see 4 to 8 patients, depending on the season. Notes are written in the morning.

7:45 a.m.: I head to Morning Report where cases are discussed with colleagues, chief resident and attendings.

8:30 a.m.: The team reconvenes (senior resident, five interns, one SMS, 3-4 JMS's). I begin our rounding with the senior resident and attending. Rounding takes approximately 2 hours depending on the census. I will then call primary care physicians, when rounds are done, if our team has non-hospitalist patients. If I am on the Red or Green team, I round with the hospitalist attending. If I am on the Purple or Orange team, I round with the sub-specialty attending.

noon: I attend noon conference where primary care and sub-specialists present various topics. Every Monday there is a case presentation to Dr. Kliegman, giving us the chance to interact with the Peds Chairman. Thursday is Professor's Rounds where senior residents present cases and grill the attendings! Board review and journal club sessions are wrapped monthly into the noon conference schedule.

1 p.m.: I finish staffing patients, write notes if needed, and follow-up on studies and consults. This is also the time I admit patients from the ER and clinics. If work is done, I will pick a teaching point to talk about with students and seniors. This is also the time I have my continuity clinic which I go to once per week.

5 p.m.: If I am the call intern (1 out of every 4 days), I stay until 8 p.m. admitting patients and taking care of our team's patients. If I am not the call intern, sign-out starts at 5 p.m.

Night float: The night float intern rotates weekly. For example, if I am on the Green Team, I will be that team's overnight intern for one, six-day stretch starting Monday evening and ending on Sunday morning. I will arrive at the hospital at 5 p.m. and get sign out from short-call intern. I will then admit patients overnight with the help of a senior resident. I finish up my work in the morning, hand-off the new admissions to the day-time intern, discuss patients at morning report and leave for home by 8:30 a.m.

Intern on Medicine (on a ward month)

Peter Cote, MDPeter Cote, MD

PGY-1, Rush University

7 a.m.: I arrive at Froedtert by 7 a.m., and round on 3 to 8 patients by 8 a.m.

8 a.m.: I meet with my team (attending, senior resident, 2 interns, one SMS, 1-2 JMS's) for work rounds. Interns are all paired with a junior medical student. We walk rounds to see patients, staff new patients and write orders.

noon: I attend Noon Report where senior residents present cases, followed-up by discussion with residents and faculty.

1 p.m.: I finish my notes, call consults, and follow-up on any studies. If on Daytime Admit Team (DAT) (1 in 5 days), my team will admit up to 6 patients. On Wednesdays I attend Academic Half Days and lectures until 3:15 p.m. During this time, the senior resident keeps intern pagers and covers for the team. This is also the time I attend my continuity clinic (once per week).

5 p.m.: If not a DAT day or on call, I sign out to the on-call team. If a DAT day, I will probably be at Froedtert until 8:30 p.m. When my team is on call (every 5th night), I will alternate between being the day intern or the overnight on-call intern. The on-call intern will stay for an overnight shift with the senior resident and senior medical student, covering non-overnight teams and doing admissions that come overnight. The day intern will do admissions during the call day but go home at night after completing admissions and cover the team the next day after the post-call intern and senior residents have signed out to them.

Resident on Pediatrics (on a non-ward month)

Kaitlyn Joyce, DOKaitlyn Joyce, DO

PGY-3, Des Moines University

8 a.m: I begin my day by rounding on patients at Children's Hospital with the attending. Typically we have 2-5 consults per day, depending on the service. Will check in on my existing patients before rounds, and discuss with the attendings regarding any consults or issues that arise on existing patients.

noon: I attend noon conference where primary care and sub-specialists present various topics. Thursday is Professor's Rounds where senior residents present cases and grill the attendings! Board review and journal club sessions are wrapped monthly into the noon conference schedule.

1 p.m.: I round on new consults with the attending. This is also the time I have my continuity clinic which I go to 1-2 times per week. If time allows, I will read independently.

4 p.m.: This is the time I wrap-up my day. I complete my consults, notify teams of recommendations and follow-up on any additional patient care items. Then I GO HOME!

Resident on Medicine (on wards)

Katrina Byrd, MDKatrina Byrd, MD

PGY-3, Meharry Medical School

7 a.m.: I arrive at Froedtert by 7 a.m. I touch-base with overnight residents and interns. I complete a chart review of patients' overnight nursing progress notes, labs and vital signs on Epic, Froedtert's integrated health information system. Lastly, I see the sick patients on the team before rounds.

9 a.m.: I meet with the team for attending rounds, and make care plans for each patient. I finish-up the morning by calling consults, discharging patients, and addressing issues that arise.

noon: I attend Noon Report where senior residents present cases, followed-up by discussion with residents and faculty.

1 p.m.: I start my afternoon off by following-up on consults and tests, lead a teaching session with students and run the team list with interns and students. This is also the time I have my continuity clinic which I go to once per week.

5 p.m.: If not on call, I sign out my patients to the on call resident team and GO HOME! If on call (once every 5th night), I start taking admissions with the overnight intern and SMS. The 2nd intern goes home, so will be fresh in the morning to help the rest of the team. During the evening I staff the intern and SMS on new admissions. We admit a maximum of 8 patients total. No new admissions after 2 a.m. I try to get a little sleep during the night, and then prepare for rounds in the a.m.

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Page Updated 08/25/2016
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