Radiology

EmailEmail    |   Bookmark Page Bookmark  |   RSS Feeds RSS  |   Print Page Print  

Medical College of Wisconsin

Department of Radiology

Collaborative Projects with General Electric Medical Systems

  • CT Scanners
    The Department of Radiology's Digital Imaging Section, under the leadership of Dennis Foley, MD, has a long-term, highly productive program of development, clinical validation, and introduction of advanced CT scanners working with the General Electric Corp.

    The most recent development, that of the 64-slice, multi-detector, ultra-fast helical CT scanner promises to be a revolutionary step in applying computed tomography to areas where it has never previously been fully effective. The areas include: Advanced vascular imaging, including coronary arteries and peripheral vessels, and very high definition, isotropic multiplanar imaging.

    The Medical College of Wisconsin Radiology Department enjoys world-wide recognition for the products of this collaboration, and has occupied this position for decades.
     
  • Diffusion-tensor Magnet Resonance
    John Ulmer, MD, Associate Professor of Radiology (Neuroradiology), is directing a program in collaboration with engineers at General Electric aimed at using diffusion-tensor magnet resonance imaging to identify and localize functional tracts in the brain. This will allow areas of critical function in the cortex of the brain, as well as the communication pathways within the brain, to be defined and allow brain-sparing and function-sparing surgery to be accurately planned.
     
  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Scott Erickson, MD, Professor of Radiology (Digital Imaging), and Mark Hohenwalter, MD, Associate Professor of Radiology (Body Interventional), and GE engineers are evaluating functional magnet resonance imaging and image quality in body applications. This is being done to improve non-neurologic functional magnetic resonance imaging and extend functional MRI applications to this area.
     
  • Next Generation X-Ray Room
    The Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Radiology and General Electric Healthcare are evaluating the next generation direct digital x-ray room, which will allow radiographs to be performed and transmitted directly to screens without the need for intervening separate detector cassettes or film.

    The next stage of this project will involve advanced image processing, such as tomosynthesis in settings like the emergency room. This will represent the next generation of the conventional x-ray machine, and is under on-site evaluation at Froedtert Hospital on campus.
webmaster@mcw.edu
© 2014 Medical College of Wisconsin
Page Updated 12/02/2013