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Dorothee Weihrauch, DVM, PhD

Dorothee-Weihrauch

Dorothee Weihrauch, DVM, PhD

Professor

Contact Information

Biography

Education

DVM, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany, 1989
PhD, Max-Planck Institute for Experimental Cardiology, Bad Nauheim, Germany, 1993
Postdoctoral training, Cardiovascular Physiology, Texas A&M, College Station, TX, 1995
Postdoctoral training, Cardiovascular Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 1996

Research Interests

  1. Genetics of cardiomyocyte and cardiac matrix interaction: The HyperGen iPSC Study
  2. Function of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in collateral growth in a model of diabetes
  3. Understanding preeclampsia: Search for novel therapeutic modalities
  4. Small molecule NO precursors as a bioactive source of NO in vasodilation and angiogenesis

Publications

Brief Research Summaries

Genetics of cardiomyocyte and cardiac matrix interaction: The HyperGen iPSC Study

This study represents one of the largest collections of existing hiPSC cell lines from an epidemiological study. As part of this project, we study the role and interaction of the cardiac matrix with expression changes on human iPSC-CMs.

Function of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in collateral growth in a model of diabetes

The function of MPO in the development of collateral growth is unknown. We are focusing on the role of MPO in a well-established model of diabetes, the db/db mouse.

Understanding preeclampsia: Novel therapeutic modalities

This study focuses on a better understanding of this multifactorial disease which affects 8% of all pregnant women and has great impact on their cardiovascular health. Our findings point us to different pathways for early and late onset of preeclampsia. We are currently pursuing the benefits of near infrared light (670nm) in this project.

Small molecule NO precursors as a bioactive source of NO in vasodilation and angiogenesis

We have found nitric oxide (NO) precursors in blood and tissues which are stimulated by 670 nm light energy (R/NIR) to release NO and produce a stable NO bound vasodilator. The goal is to assess the impact of these iron and thiol based NO precursors in a chronic model of angiogenesis-rat hindlimb ischemia.