Physician Patient

Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine

Clinical Rotations and Didactics

MCW Front MCW Buildings

Major Rotations

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Cancer Psychology

Cancer Psychology: Heidi Christianson, PhD, Jo Weis, PhD & Lyndsey Wallace, PsyD

Cancer psychology is the practice of health psychology as it applies to those being treated with cancer and addresses issues of adjustment to illness, coping with chronic illness, adherence and behavioral management, and end-of-life care. Cancer psychologists work with patients and their family members to help cope with cancer as well as the impacts it has on functioning, emotional distress, mental health, and family relationships. Cancer psychologists work in both the inpatient and outpatient setting and as part of a multidisciplinary team (both more remotely and very integrally).

Direct Services
Cancer psychology has areas of focus on coping and adjustment, management of psychological distress and disorder, and family functioning at times of illness.

  • Assessment – Pre-bone marrow transplant evaluation, biopsychosocial intake interviews (inpatient and outpatient) with medically ill patients, assessment for behavioral management
  • Behavior Therapy - Behavioral activation, adherence and compliance management
  • Health and Behavioral Intervention - Coping skills training, sleep hygiene, psychoeducation
  • Pain management – nonpharmacologic treatment for acute and chronic pain
  • Inpatient/Outpatient Psychotherapy – Psychological disorder (depression, anxiety, PTSD), adjustment to illness (newly diagnosed patients, chronically ill patients, fostering
  • Post Traumatic Growth, patients and families at end-of-life)
  • Stress management – Mindfulness, relaxation strategies, cognitive restructuring

Integrated Behavioral Health
Cancer psychologists work as part of multidisciplinary teams, collaborating with physicians, advanced practice providers (APPs), nurses, social workers, medical residents, and medical fellows. The psychology resident will have opportunities to collaborate with other disciplines in the following ways:

  • Providing training on psychological issues with cancer patients to nursing staff
  • Attending weekly bone marrow transplant (BMT) multidisciplinary rounds
  • Attending palliative care multidisciplinary staffing
  • Providing consultation and behavioral management to nursing and medical staff for problematic patient behavior
  • Collaborate with inpatient treatment teams (primary APPs, resident physicians, and fellow physicians) on psychological contributions to patient’s care
  • Promote effective patient-provider relationships
Inpatient Rehabilitation

Inpatient Rehabilitation: Rebeccah Manson, PhD & Michael Smith, PsyD

Rehabilitation Psychology promotes recovery, health, and quality of life with individuals experiencing significant injury, illness, and disability. Rehabilitation psychologists work to maximize independence and choice, functional abilities, and social role participation across the lifespan. We also work with other professionals to enhance their ability to provide even more effective care that incorporates the patient’s behavioral and mental health needs.

Health psychology residents function as part of an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team to provide integrated behavioral health services, working with patients, families, and other professionals. Froedtert Health operates four inpatient rehabilitation programs: General Rehabilitation, Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, and Brain Injury. Each is fully accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

Direct Services

Given the emphasis of rehabilitation on post-discharge success, health psychology interventions maximize rehabilitation potential and reduce barriers to successful adjustment.


  • Assessment – standardized screenings and clinical interviews
  • Behavior Therapy – behavioral activation, compliance skills, communications skills
  • Crisis Intervention –family conflict, medical emergency, patient aggression, self-harm
  • Health Behavior Intervention – diet & exercise, sleep, health care system skills
  • Pain Management – nonpharmacologic treatment for acute and chronic pain
  • Inpatient Psychotherapy – anxiety, depression, psychological trauma, substance use
  • Stress Management – locus of control, relaxation methods, time management

Residents play a significant role coordinating and promoting peer mentoring programs in the spinal cord injury and general rehabilitation programs. They also take post-discharge outpatient psychotherapy cases on a limited basis.

Integrated Behavioral Health

Psychological services in rehabilitation are provided within an integrated behavioral health (IBH) model. Rehabilitation psychologists and residents function as an integrated part of an interdisciplinary team which includes Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) physicians, nursing, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, recreational therapists, vocational counselors, social workers, case managers, dietitians, and nurses. Psychology residents collaborate with other rehabilitation disciplines in the following ways:

  • Co-treat with other disciplines to more effectively address mental or behavioral health concerns
  • Consult with staff regarding patients’ psychological functioning
  • Participate in weekly team conferences
  • Attend daily rounds with PM&R physicians and residents
  • Facilitate effective communication between patients and providers
  • Provide education and clinical training to MCW students, residents, fellows, therapists, and nursing
  • Offer guidance for staff to most effectively work with patients’ support systems
  • Build staff knowledge and skills regarding mental illness
  • Encourage teamwork among the staff
  • Collaborate with staff to promote community-building among patients in rehabilitation unit.
  • Help differentiate between normative and maladaptive adjustment reactions
  • Promote effective patient-provider relationships
  • Provide behavior management interventions to help staff effectively manage challenging behaviors while providing care
Transplant Psychology

Transplant Psychology: Stephanie C. Zanowski, PhD & Jenessa S. Price, PhD

The Transplant Mental Health Program consists of two Clinical Psychologists, three Social Workers, and one Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) Counselor. Transplant Psychologists assess candidacy from a biopsychosocial perspective for patients in evaluation for solid organ transplant and provide both initial as well as ongoing psychosocial recommendations to patients and team members. In addition, Transplant Psychologists provide supportive therapy and empirically-based interventions to patients pre- and post-transplant on both an inpatient and outpatient basis; services include coping with chronic illness, adjusting to medical illness, mood management, adherence, and drug and alcohol relapse prevention.

Direct Services

Transplant Psychology has areas of focus on assessment of psychosocial risk factors, psychological disorders, and cognition in addition to implementation of interventions addressing coping and adjustment, management of psychological distress and disorder, management of adherence, and addiction:

  • Psychosocial/Psychological Assessment – Pre-transplant (kidney, liver, LVAD/heart, lung) psychosocial evaluation for transplant (typically outpatient); urgent inpatient psychosocial evaluation for transplant; general psychological evaluations (outpatient)
  • Neuropsychological assessment – Assessment of cognitive strengths and limitations utilizing abbreviated assessment batteries (outpatient)
  • Inpatient/Outpatient Psychotherapy – Psychological disorder (depression, anxiety, PTSD, bipolar disorder); adjustment to acute and chronic illness; CBT and nonpharmacologic treatment for pain
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Training – Mindfulness; emotion regulation; distress tolerance; acceptance; interpersonal effectiveness
  • Health and Behavioral Intervention – Adherence management; implementation of cognitive compensatory strategies; coping skills/relaxation training; sleep hygiene; psychoeducation
  • Motivational Interviewing – Adherence management; drug and alcohol misuse/use disorders
  • Relapse Prevention – Individual and group treatment for drug and alcohol use disorders

Integrated Behavioral Health

Transplant Psychologists serve as integral members of multidisciplinary treatment teams, composed of other members of Transplant Mental Health (Social Workers, AODA Counselor) as well as surgeons, specialty physicians, advanced practice providers (APPs), nurses, and medical residents and fellows. The psychology resident will have opportunities to collaborate with other disciplines in the following ways:

  • Provide initial and ongoing recommendations for candidacy to patient coordinators and other treatment providers
  • Consultation with members of the Mental Health team, including Social Workers and the AODA Coordinator
  • Attend weekly Multidisciplinary Selection Committee meetings for kidney, liver, LVAD/heart and/or lung
  • Provide inpatient consultation and ongoing supportive therapy to patients and coordinate care with medical staff (APPs, resident physicians, and fellow physicians) during the patient’s stay
  • Promote effective patient-provider relationships
  • Provide education on the biopsychosocial perspective and training to other medical professionals, including nurses and medical residents
Trauma and Critical Care

Trauma and Critical Care: Terri deRoon-Cassini, PhD & Josh Hunt, PhD

The trauma center at Froedtert Hospital/Medical College of Wisconsin is a Level 1 adult trauma center accredited by the American College of Surgeon Committee on Trauma. This trauma center serves 3000 trauma activations per year, with just over 2,000 of those patients being admitted to the hospital. This unique program includes a psychologist focused on the psychological and behavioral health needs of the trauma population and patients receiving emergent surgery. The psychological care is provided as a part of a multidisciplinary team of advanced practice providers, nurses, surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, case managers, social workers, and physical and occupational therapists.

Health psychology residents function as part of an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team to provide integrated behavioral health services, working with patients, families, and other professionals. Residents will assist with supervising practicum trainees and work with the trauma & health psychology postdoctoral fellow.

Direct Services

Given the emphasis of rehabilitation on post-discharge success, health psychology interventions maximize rehabilitation potential and reduce barriers to successful adjustment.

  • Assessment – clinical interviews and cognitive assessments as needed
  • Behavior Therapy – behavioral activation, adherence and compliance management
  • Health and Behavioral Intervention – psychoeducation and coping skills training, early prolonged exposure therapy for high PTSD risk
  • Interpersonal Intervention – family dynamics, discussion with family regarding medical decision making
  • Pain Management – nonpharmacologic treatment for acute and chronic pain
  • Inpatient Psychotherapy – adjustment to illness, anxiety, depression, PTSD, substance use
  • Stress Management – relaxation training and mindfulness based stress reduction

Integrated Behavioral Health

Trauma and critical care psychologists work as a part of a multidisciplinary team, collaborating with advanced practice providers, physicians, nurses, social workers, medical residents and fellows, and physical and occupational therapists. Psychology residents collaborate with other rehabilitation disciplines in the following ways:

  • Provide training regarding psychological response to trauma and critical illness to other staff members and trainees
  • Attend daily clinical care rounds with other members of the multidisciplinary team
  • Consult with staff regarding patients’ psychological functioning
  • Facilitate effective communication between patients and providers
  • Help differentiate between normative and maladaptive adjustment reactions
  • Provide behavior management interventions to help staff effectively manage challenging behaviors while providing care
  • Facilitate resiliency by encouraging non-avoidance of trauma related triggers and educate staff regarding behaviors that will facilitate better psychological outcomes

Continuity Clinic

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Behavioral Medicine and Primary Care (BMPC) Clinic

Behavioral Medicine and Primary Care (BMPC) Clinic: Sadie Larsen, PhD & Larry Miller, PsyD

The Behavioral Medicine and Primary Care (BMPC) Clinic is a psychodiagnostic and psychotherapeutic clinic focusing on primary care and specialty health psychology. This clinic serves the behavioral health needs of patients being treated in primary care as well as patients being seen in specialty care clinics without direct access to health psychology services. The BMPC Clinic is housed in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine and is an outpatient, ambulatory clinic.

Patients who are treated in this clinic will have a health condition for which they are receiving treatment. The clinic provides the following treatments for the following concerns: brief cognitive behavioral intervention for depression and anxiety, CBT for insomnia, behavioral activation, behavioral therapy for non-adherence, adjustment to illness, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and brief mindfulness approaches to symptom management. Residents will also have the opportunity to carry a case or two long-term where the presenting concern is managing chronic illness.

Direct Services

The goal of this clinic includes optimizing physical health through management of psychological barriers, coping with chronic illness, symptom management, and adjustment to illness.

  • Assessment – clinical biopsychosocial interviews, health psychology assessment and brief testing
  • Behavior Therapy – behavioral activation, compliance skills, communications skills, optimizing coping
  • Health Behavior Intervention – diet & exercise, sleep, medication adherence, health care system skills
  • Pain Management – nonpharmacologic treatment for acute and chronic pain in medically complex patients
  • Brief Psychotherapy for psychopathology – anxiety, depression, health-related traumatic responses, substance use, management of personality disorders in medically complicated patient
  • Stress Management – locus of control, relaxation methods, time management, mindfulness

Residents will maintain and ongoing outpatient caseload of patients with a broad range of health-related problems, implementing empirically validated approaches as well as managing coping and adjustment to illness and/or injury.

Integrated Behavioral Health

Psychology residents will collaborate with multiple health professionals through medical record, phone consultation, and collaborative practice. Although this clinic is not co-located, the system in which the clinic is located is connected through a large medical record system. Resident will become familiar with coordinating care across multiple treating providers who are not located together:

  • Co-treat with other disciplines to more effectively address mental or behavioral health concerns and communicate via medical record and other forms of technology
  • Consult with staff regarding patients’ psychological functioning via electronic medical record
  • Be available for behavioral health consultation from providers in the health enterprise as requested
  • Consult on behavioral management interventions via medical record and/or phone to help medical providers effectively manage challenging behaviors while providing care

Required Didactics

List of Didactics Topics (PDF)