Medical School

Scholarly Pathways

MCW's Scholarly Pathways allow you to individualize your medical school experience by exploring a career path that is of interest to you, and of vital importance to the lives of your future patients.

Bioethics and Medical Humanities

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

The Bioethics & Medical Humanities Pathway will enable medical students to integrate the knowledge and tools of bioethics and medical humanities into their careers as physicians.  This will be achieved through a variety of activities that encompass knowledge of the bioethics scholarly literature through discussion and application of analytic frameworks to clinical ethics, research ethics and ethics teaching. Additionally, the knowledge and skills of bioethics and medical humanities will enable medical students to strengthen their professionalism, improve communication, preserve empathy and support reflective practice.  

The pathway activities will provide medical students the opportunity to develop their ethics skills in a variety of areas, including but not limited to clinical ethics consultation, research ethics, and participation and leadership in institutional ethics committees. 
Pathway Directors

Pathway Directors

Cynthiane J. Morgenweck, MD, MA
Associate Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities

Arthur . Derse, MD, JD
Director, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities
Julia and David Uihlein Chair in Medical Humanities
Professor of Bioethics and Emergency Medicine

Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal: 

To provide future physicians with the knowledge and skills of bioethics and medical humanities to support and enhance their practice of medicine through emerging ethical expertise, professionalism, communication, empathy and reflection.  

Pathway Competencies and Objectives:

Knowledge for Practice

  • Describe the foundations of ethical theories used to analyze biomedical ethical issues 
  • Explain the principles of bioethics and their application, including beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice 
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of bioethics frameworks to analyze clinical cases, including medical indications, patient preference, quality of life and contextual features 
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the application of bioethics principles to individual scholarly projects 
  • Recount the history of research ethics and delineate the role of IRBs in human subject research 
  • Analyze bioethical issues in patient care, professional interactions and societal policy, including, Informed Consent and Refusal, Confidentiality and Privacy, Allocation of Health Care Resources and Organ Transplantation, End of Life Care, Reproductive and Genetic Ethics, Pediatric and Adolescent Ethics, Ethical Issues selected specialty care areas
  • Describe medical humanities techniques including the use of narrative medicine, and articulate how these methods strengthen professionalism, improve communication, preserve empathy and support reflective practice 

Interpersonal Communication:

  • Explain how the Pathway has made an impact on the student’s approach to patient care and research projects
  • Utilize bioethics and medical humanities techniques to improve communication and demonstrate empathy
Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Core Session Topics:

  • Bioethics: Principles; Methods of Case Analysis
  • History of Medical Ethics 
  • Ethics Committees and Ethics Consultation 
  • Research Ethics and Research Regulations 
  • Law and Bioethics 
  • Specialty Ethics: Pediatrics, Ob/Gyn, Surgery, Psychiatry, Emergency Medicine 
  • Ethical issues in Genomic/Personalized Medicine 
  • Ethical patient care in times of disaster/pandemic 
  • Culture, Profession, and the Virtues of Medicine  

Examples of Non-core Activities:

  • Bioethics & Medical Humanities Monthly Grand Rounds and special lectures 
  • Student/Resident led reflective writing workshops focusing on ethical issues 
  • Research Review Panel (student-led) 
  • M1 Healer’s Art Academic Enrichment Elective 
  • Bioethics Interest Group 
  • Auscult (MCW literary journal) 
  • Medical Humanities Interest Group  
  • Physicians for the Arts 
  • MCW Common Read 
  • Memory Art Project (creating art with elders) 
  • Med Moth (storytelling) 
  • Visual Thinking Strategies (viewing and reflecting on art works) sessions 
  • Medical Improvisation (Improv) sessions 
  • Graphic Medicine sessions 
  • Film Series 
Additional Resources and Information

Additional Resources and Information

Clinician Educator

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

The Clinician Educator Pathway is designed for students interested in the theory and methods of teaching and learning in medical education. Students will explore methods to improve teaching in the clinical setting, learn how to apply educational principles to the development of educational materials and curricula, and develop a scholarly educational product.  
Pathway Director

Pathway Director

Joseph Budovec, MD
Associate Professor
Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal:

Pathway activities address:

  • Developing skills to teach in various settings 
  • Learning about how adults learn and different styles of learning 
  • Developing instruction for medical students, residents, and other health care practitioners 
  • Advising/mentoring peers and others 
  • Designing evaluation tools 
  • Leading groups involved in education 

Pathway Competencies or Objectives:

  • Teaching & Learning 
  • Curriculum Development 
  • Advising & Mentoring 
  • Learner Assessment 
  • Leadership & Administration 
  • Evaluation 
Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Core Session Topics:

  • Program Development 
  • Learning Environments & Communities 
  • Teaching Styles 
  • Mentorship 
  • How to Deliver and Design and Excellent Education Presentation 
  • Design Thinking for Curriculum Development  

Examples of Non-core Activities 

  • Peer tutoring 
  • Admissions interviewer 
  • Testing of new educational methods 
  • Innovations in Health Care Education Research Conference Judge 
  • Saturday Clinic for the Uninsured 
  • Warrior Partnership 

Clinical and Translational Research

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

The CTR Pathway is for students interested in complementing their clinical development with the skills required to become clinician-scientists. Through core sessions and a mentored research project, students gain an understanding of the way clinical and translational research improves patient care. This Pathway uses a hypothesis driven research project to provide the student an individualized research experience allowing for the development of research skills.
Pathway Directors

Pathway Directors

Joseph Carroll_Pathways

Joe Carroll, PhD
Professor, Ophthalmology; Biophysics; Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy

knight-jennifer

Jennifer M. Knight, MD, MS
Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine and Microbiology & Immunology 

Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal:

The Clinical and Translational Research Pathway is for students interested in complementing their clinical development with the skills required to become clinician-scientists. Through core sessions and a mentored research project, students gain an understanding of the way research improves patient care. Encompassing clinical and translational research, this Pathway uses a hypothesis driven research project to provide the student an individualized research experience allowing for the development of broad research skills.  Students participating in this pathway will be able to describe and apply key principles associated with the design, implementation, analysis, and reporting/dissemination of research.  The pathway will also support those students who seek to pursue research throughout their medical careers. 

Pathway Competencies and Objectives:

  • Formulate a research question and operationalize variables.  
  • Design descriptive and/or explanatory studies.  
  • Collect and analyze data.  
  • Evaluate and discuss study findings.  
  • Manage research projects.  
  • Interpret theory and empirical findings in one's own research area.
Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Core Session Topics:

  • Research Question refinement 
  • Study design principles 
  • Scientific writing and presentations 
  • Ethics of research 
  • An individualized, mentored research project 
  • Abstract and poster critique 
  • Abstract rating workshop 

Examples of Non-core Activities:

  • Learning about IRB processes 
  • Attending classes about bibliographic software, statistical analyses and/or software 
  • Research meeting with PI and research group 
  • Performing data collection 
  • Meeting with biostatisticians 

Global Health Pathway

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

The Global Health Pathway is designed for students interested in understanding the healthcare needs of patients, families, and communities around the world. It prepares students for the challenges of working in areas of the world with limited health care resources. Core curriculum topics are consistent with those proposed by the Consortium of Universities for Global Health and other medical schools that have long been on the forefront of global health education and research. Pathway activities are coordinated with the office of the Associate Dean for Global Health. 
Pathway Directors

Pathway Directors

kirsten-beyer-120x160

Kirsten Beyer, PhD, MPH, MS
Associate Professor, Institute for Health & Equity

Megan Schultz_Pathways

Megan Schultz, MD, MA
Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal:

Pathway students learn lessons about global health disparities, cultural diversity and service to vulnerable communities both locally and globally.  The Pathway is designed to help students develop skills and leadership attributes that can lead to being successful physicians in a variety of resourced settings. Students gain the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to effectively address global health burdens such as obesity, diabetes, HIV, epidemics or issues such as immigrant and refugee health, regardless of a local or global location. The Pathway supports a vision of reducing health inequities through collaborative partnerships in education, clinical care, and community engagement. The goal of the Pathway is to train the global physician leaders of tomorrow. 

Pathway Competencies or Objectives:

Knowledge for Practice

  • Identify reliable sources of information on global health issues and  organizations dedicated to advancing global health sciences in  education and research 
  • Describe the core definition and science of global health  
  • Develop knowledge of the challenges and strengths of practicing medicine in limited-, and high-resource settings.   
  • Appreciate the changing impact of infectious diseases, chronic diseases, and injuries on morbidity and mortality in global settings 
  • Demonstrate understanding of how global health issues may impact countries and cities that sponsor immigrants and refugees such as Milwaukee  
  • Identify specific global health burdens and develop an understanding of how to address these burdens across a spectrum of environments.  

Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

  • Develop an understanding of the scope of local and global collaborations active at MCW, Froedtert Health, Children’s Health Systems, and in SE Wisconsin 

Interpersonal, Communication and Professionalism

  • Identify skills necessary for a mutually beneficial global health elective experience 

Personal and Professional Development

  • Articulate a matured understanding of how one might integrate global health sciences into a professional career  
  • Appreciate the complexity of effective problem-solving and health services delivery needed during natural disasters and mass casualties in the international arena 
  • Expand the understanding of a specific global health issue and country which is of particular personal interest. 
Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Core Session Topics

  • Disaster management and preparedness 
  • Health care delivery systems 
  • Refugee, immigrant and adoptee health 
  • Injury prevention and control 
  • The global burden of disease - trends, epidemiology and non-communicable disease 
  • Skill building for working in limited resourced conditions 
  • Skill building in communicating across languages and cultures 
  • Telemedicine 

Examples of Non-core Activities

  • Working in local clinics and with organizations that serve immigrant, refugee or non-US born patients.  
  • Researching and studying specific global health issues  
  • Developing and implementing health education initiatives in the community 
  • Basic and clinical science topics: vaccine development, toxins, EMS services, non-communicable diseases, drug discovery for neglected tropical diseases, immunopathogens of infectious diseases 
Additional Resources and Information

Additional Resources and Information

Health Systems Management and Policy

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

The HSMP Pathway will help students understand health policy and the business and economics of medicine. It will also provide students with leadership skills so that they can participate in the changes needed for the U.S. health care system to improve and thrive. The goal of this Pathway is to provide a working knowledge of the health care systems for students who have an interest in pursuing administrative and leadership roles in their future, who would like to effectively advocate for the development and implementation of health policies, and who desire a deeper understanding of how health care is structured and delivered so that they will be a more valuable member or a leader in their health care organization in the future. 
Pathway Directors

Pathway Directors

Meurer John

John Meurer, MD, MBA
Professor of Pediatrics and Community Health
Director of the Institute for Health & Equity

hueston_william

William Hueston, MD
Senior Associate Dean, Academic Affairs
Professor, Family Medicine

Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal:

The Health Systems Management and Policy Pathway will link how health systems and the policies that drive those systems influence how care is delivered and how these policies drive the decisions that are made by health care organizations and by individual physicians. 

Pathway Competencies:

Knowledge for Practice

  • Apply principles of epidemiologic sciences to the identification of health care problems, risk factors, treatment strategies, resources, and disease prevention/health promotion efforts for patients and populations.

Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

  • Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and expertise
  • Set independent learning and improvement goals
  • Utilize feedback to improve daily practice.

Patient Care

  • Demonstrate honesty, integrity, and respect in all interactions and patient care
  • Demonstrate accountability to patients, society, and the profession
  • Demonstrate a commitment to ethic principles in everyday patient care including but not limited to provision or withholding of care, confidentiality, informed consent, and business practices, including compliance with relevant law, policies, and regulations

System-Based Practice:

  • Advocate for quality patient care and optimal patient care systems
  • Work effectively in various health care delivery setting and systems
  • Coordinate patient care within the health care system
  • Incorporate considerations of cost awareness and risk-benefit analysis in patient and/or population based care
  • Participate in identifying system errors and solutions.

Interprofessional, Communication and Professionalism

  • Communicate effectively with colleagues within one’s profession or specialty, other health professionals, and health related agencies
  • Work effectively with others as a member or leader of health care teams or other professional group
  • Collaborate with other health care professionals to establish and maintain a climate of mutual respect, dignity, diversity, ethical integrity, and trust
  • Identify one’s own role and the roles of other health professionals to appropriately assess and address the health care needs of patients and populations served
  • Demonstrate level-appropriate leadership skills

 

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Core Session Topics

  • Health systems in the U.S. and in developed countries
  • The health systems workforce in the United States
  • How healthcare is financed
  • Quality and variation in healthcare
  • Population health
  • Advocacy in healthcare

Examples of Non-core Activities

  • Meetings of the Wisconsin Medical Society or local county medical society, or specialty organizations
  • Health advocacy meetings with legislators and administrators
  • Participating in the annual Wisconsin Medical Society Doctor's Day at the State Capitol
  • Attending the MCW Institutional Finance Advisory Committee, Board of Directors meeting, or Finance Committee meetings of the Medical College Physicians (MCP) or Children’s Specialty Group (CSG). 
  • Participating in other meeting focused on specific areas of care such as the Emergency Medical System, trauma center, or stroke care. 
Additional Resources and Information

Additional Resources and Information

Resources for more in-depth reading in this area will include chapters from text books that are available in the MCW library or on loan from the Pathway directors:

  • “Understanding Health Policy, Sixth Edition” by Thomas Bodenheimer and Kevin Grumbach
  • “Delivering Health Care in Health Systems Management & Policy in America, a Systems Approach" by Luiyu Shi and Douglas Singh
  • “Generalist Medicine and the U.S. Health System,” by Stephen Isaacs and James Knickman

On-line modules produced by the AMSA Business in Medicine Interest Group

Molecular and Cellular Research

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

The MCR Pathway provides core research skills in the area of basic science research. This Pathway is focused on competencies that can be gained from scientific research that are transferable to clinical practice, including communication (oral and written), time management, information gathering, critical thinking/critical assessment (i.e. data analysis, critical reading of scientific literature), and problem solving. Students learn to work in teams and/or independently. 
Pathway Director

Pathway Director

Jennifer L. Strande, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Medicine
Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal:

The Molecular and Cellular Research pathway seeks to provide students with core research skills in the area of basic science at the level of the animal, cells and molecules. This will be accomplished through a combination of core curricular activities, and mentored research in order to directly apply those core skills.  Students participating in this pathway will be able to describe and apply key principles associated with the design, implementation, analysis, and reporting/dissemination of research. The pathway will support those students who seek to pursue research throughout their medical careers.  The pathway will also allow the students to sharpen other skills important for the practice of medicine including communication, documenting observations, teamwork, time management, and critical thinking. A central component of the pathway is participation in/completion of a mentored research project. 

Pathway Competencies or Objectives:

  • First-hand experience in the acquisition and synthesis of new knowledge by executing experiments and analyzing data 
  • In-depth understanding of a health-related issue through research, synthesizing this understanding by writing abstracts, manuscript or presentations 
  • A mentoring relationship with a faculty mentor outside the usual course structure 
  • Interpret theory and empirical findings in one's own research area by collecting and interpreting research findings 
  • Develop critical thinking and independent learning skills 
Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Topics and Activities

Examples of Core Session Topics

  • How to take a clinical question and turn it into a research question 
  • Authorship Ethics 
  • Scientific Writing 
  • Journal Clubs 
  • The importance of accurate documentation 
  • How to write an abstract and develop a poster 
  • How to peer review and give constructive feedback 

Examples of Non-core Activities

  • Completing IACUC training 
  • Attending classes about citation management software 
  • Attend research Lab team meetings or meeting with mentor 
  • Performing experiments and analyzing data 
  • Attending seminars or conferences related to research topic 
  • Writing abstracts and/or manuscripts 
  • Developing a poster or oral presentation 

Quality Improvement and Patient Safety

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QuIPS) provides students with the core principles and skills necessary to understand and analyze the systems-based aspects of patient care, to actively engage in quality improvement work, and to enhance patient safety with the of achieving the best possible health outcomes for patients. 
Pathway Director

Pathway Director

Cassie Ferguson, MD
Assistant Professor, Pediatrics
Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goal:

The Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QuIPS) scholarly pathway at The Medical College of Wisconsin provides students with an important set of skills that will complement any field of medicine. Students will learn the core principles and skills necessary to understand and analyze the systems-based aspects of patient care, actively engage in work to improve the quality of patient care and enhance patient safety while focusing on the goal of achieving the best possible health outcomes for patients and for populations.  

Pathway Competencies and Objectives:

Year 1  

  • Define safety in systems and human factors science  
  • Describe the concept of process mapping in the health care setting  
  • Create an overall process map  
  • Explain the importance of systems design in decreasing the potential for human error  
  • Evaluate the strength of different types of QI interventions  
  • Demonstrate through role play the skills needed to work in a multidisciplinary team  
  • Explain why physicians are integral to QI efforts  
  • Demonstrate through a simulated patient interaction the skills needed to recognize a medical emergency, ask for appropriate resources, and identify systems-based and process-based failures

Year 2

  • Describe the interactions between systems of care and their impact on a patient with a chronic illness  
  • Rate the understanding of patient experience as valuable in health care systems design  
  • Recognize the impact of an adverse event on the patient, patient’s family, and the patient’s physicians  
  • Define ‘root cause analysis’ and explain its importance to process improvement  
  • List three process improvement techniques and describe how each technique attempts to influence changes associated with systems  
  • Balance one’s own responsibilities and goals for patient care with the role of a team member in shared decision-making  
  • Define ‘medical hierarchy’ and ‘culture of safety’  
  • Explain and list examples of how the medical hierarchy may prevent medical students from reporting and preventing errors during clerkships  
  • Describe how a medical student might bring an error or ‘near miss’ to the attention of a supervisor  
  • List and practice three skills that can improve resilience and prevent burnout in medical school  
  • Describe some of the challenges of engaging physicians in QI efforts  
  • Demonstrate how to disclose an adverse event to a standardized patient following a simulated patient interaction  

Year 3

  • Explain effective care, supply-sensitive care, and preference-sensitive care as defined by the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care  
  • Describe the misuse of preference-sensitive care as it relates to the care of patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy  
  • Examine the relationship between patient satisfaction and health care utilization and expenditures  
  • Explain the origin of the SQUIRE publication guidelines and identify how a group of authors used the guidelines to publish their work  
  • Explain how to choose the appropriate statistical process control chart for a particular set of data  
  • Interpret and critique quality improvement research  
  • Identify and critique the components of the Affordable Care Act related to quality improvement  
  • Describe important aspects of physician resilience  
  • List three strategies to engage health care providers in QI efforts  
  • Lead a simulated patient interaction and help first- and second-year QuIPS pathway students identify systems-based and process-based failures  
  • Prepare an annotated curriculum vitae that reflects the knowledge, skills, and experiences gained through the QuIPS curriculum 
Examples of Non-core Activities

Examples of Non-core Activities

Refer to the QuIPS Non-core Activities (PDF) for additional information.

  • AHRQ case reviews - online
  • TeamSTEPPS training
  • Joint Quality Steering Committee
  • Patient Safety Committee
  • Milwaukee County Patient Safety Collaborative
  • Infection Control
  • Patient shadowing
Additional Resources and Information

Additional Resources and Information

The Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Pathway offers three themes: 

  • Learning to optimize systems of care and functions as a member of the healthcare teams 
  • Principles of Safety and Medical Error 
  • Development of Quality Improvement skills 

Urban & Community Health

About the Pathway

About the Pathway

Both population health and patient-centered care perspectives recognize the influence of lifestyle, socio-economic factors, community resources and environmental hazards on morbidity, mortality and well-being. The Urban & Community Health (UCH) Pathway links education with community needs and assets, to prepare students to effectively care for patients in urban communities, promote community health, and reduce health disparities.
Pathway Directors

Pathway Directors

Rebecca Bernstein, MD

Rebecca Bernstein, MD, MS
Associate Professor, Family and Community Medicine

meurer

Linda N. Meurer, MD, MPH
Professor, Family and Community Medicine

Goals and Competencies

Goals and Competencies

Goals:

The Urban and Community Health Pathway aims to prepare young physicians to best care for urban, underserved and vulnerable populations by addressing social and environmental factors that contribute to health disparities.  By engaging in service-learning, students partner with community organizations to address community-identified needs to learn about the context in which patients live and service is provided, and to expand their sociocultural awareness and their roles as citizens and professionals. 

The UCH pathway links education with community needs and assets to shape knowledge, skills and attitudes needed by effective medical providers in urban, under-served communities, addressing: 

  • The balance between biologic and non-biologic determinants of health and disease 
  • Health conditions that disproportionately affect urban, under-served populations 
  • Disparities in health, healthcare access and quality in urban settings 
  • Educational strategies to promote healthy behaviors in individuals and communities. 
  • Partnership with public health/ community agencies to meet health/ healthcare needs 
  • Civic-engagement and leadership skills, including ability to advocate for patients, communities and/or systems changes to improve health.  

Pathway Competencies or Objectives:

Knowledge for Practice

  • Describe the influence of non-biologic health determinants (e.g. gender, race, culture, SES, health literacy) on health and well-being; the natural progression of disease; and on the delivery of effective medical care. 
  • Describe the complex interplay of factors that lead to disparities in health, and health care access, quality and outcomes. 
  • Describe the cultural dimensions of practice, including: cultural influences on individuals and communities, cultural influences on clinicians’ delivery of health services, and culturally competent health care. 

Patient Care

  • Integrate knowledge of socioeconomic health determinants in assessment, diagnosis and management of common illnesses (e.g. asthma, depression, hypertension, diabetes, influenza, HIV). 
  • Effectively manage chronic illnesses/ health conditions which disproportionately affect urban, underserved people. 
  • Demonstrate ability to work with and around barriers/obstacles – political, social, and medical – to provide the best quality care to patients in urban, underserved settings. 
  • Identify and employ local assets/resources and social supports, assistance programs and other community resources to assist patients in health improvement. 
  • Discuss how public policy and population-based initiatives can influence health determinants and outcomes. 
  • Participate in population health improvement strategies. 
  • Describe and compare the healthcare options for Milwaukee residents- know the eligibility requirements, benefits offered, healthcare systems available, pharmacotherapy options for patients with various insurance situations. 

Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

  • Discuss the organization and financing of the U.S. health care system, and their effects on access, cost, utilization and quality of care for individuals and populations. 
  • Differentiate between individual and population-based approaches to health. 
  • Assess the health status of populations using available data (e.g. public health surveillance data, vital statistics, registries, surveys, electronic health records and health plan claims data. 

Interpersonal Communication and Professionalism

  • Employ effective educational strategies to promote healthy behaviors in individuals and communities. 
  • Communicate effectively with people of different backgrounds in a manner that is culturally sensitive, clinically effective, and critically mindful of harmful stereotypes and characterizations. 
  • Demonstrate self-awareness of one’s own personal biases toward individuals & groups (e.g. race, gender, culture). Appreciate the culture, heritage, strengths, and challenges of Milwaukee’s diverse central city neighborhoods. 

 

Examples of Activities

Examples of Activities

Examples of Non-core Activities:

A variety of experiences may make up the non-core activity requirements, depending on the student’s interests/goals. Students are encouraged to explore possible projects and experiences with a faculty advisor and select activities that help them meet the goals outlined in their Individual Learning Plan. Artifacts/ reflections/ other products can be collected in their learning portfolio, to be shared and reviewed with their advisor later in the year. 

  • Mentored Scholarship - A majority of effort for M3 students will likely be devoted to completion of the scholarly project, as outlined in their Project Proposal during the previous year. 
  • Service Learning Activities - These are faculty mentored, community engaged, outreach, and health promotion or education projects.  Available partnerships will be presented during the Fall orientation and listed in Brightspace/D2L.   
  • Urban Community Direct Patient Care Experiences - Includes participation in the Saturday Clinic for the Uninsured 
  • Episodic Events, Activities and Assignments - See sample templates in Brightspace
Additional Resources and Information

Additional Resources and Information

Pathway activities address:

  • The balance between biologic and non-biologic determinants of health 
  • Medical conditions that disproportionately affect urban, underserved populations 
  • Disparities in health, healthcare access and quality in urban settings 
  • Community-based educational strategies to promote healthy behaviors 
  • Partnership with public health and community agencies to meet health/ healthcare needs 
  • Civic-engagement and leadership skills, including the ability to advocate for patients, communities and systems changes to improve health 

Service Learning Activities

These are faculty mentored, community engaged, outreach, and health promotion or education projects.  Available partnerships will be presented during the Fall orientation and listed in Brightspace/D2L.   

New partnerships may be proposed by students, faculty and/or community partners. 

Please note: An approved Service Learning Proposal is required for new projects before participation can count toward noncore hours. See Community Service Guidelines on the Pathways Information website. 

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Physician in the Community Pathway - MCW-Green Bay and MCW-Central Wisconsin
As an MCW-Green Bay or MCW-Central Wisconsin student, you’ll participate in our Physician in the Community Pathway, linking your medical education with the resources of our clinical partners and the needs of the Green Bay-area communities to promote health in Northern Wisconsin. This unique MCW experience is designed to cultivate your medical skills and interests, transforming them into a quest for lifelong learning in your practice as a primary care physician, general surgeon or psychiatrist.

Learn more about the Scholarly Pathways at each campus: