Forum for Behavioral Science in Family MedicineForum for Behavioral Science in Family Medicine

First held in 1980, The Forum for Behavioral Science in Family Medicine has served to stimulate the advancement of behavioral science in family medicine for 34 consecutive years. At the core of The Forum’s success are three objectives: promote professional networking, provide high quality professional development opportunities, and advance the integration of behavioral science in family medicine training.

The Department of Family Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin has sponsored The Forum since 1999, and The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine has recognized and endorsed the conference since 1981.

Target Audience
Physicians, behavioral scientists/coordinators and allied health professionals in family medical education.

The 36th Forum for Behavioral Science in Family Medicine

September 17 – 20, 2015

Doubletree by Hilton Chicago – Magnificent Mile – Chicago, IL
This year’s theme: Making the Milestones Matter

Hotel Information

DoubleTree by Hilton Chicago, Magnificent Mile – Chicago, IL
300 E. Ohio St.
Chicago, IL 60611
(312) 787-6100


Telephone Reservations: (800) 222-8733

Please indicate you are with The 36th Forum for Behavioral Science in Family Medicine group or group code BSM.

Online Reservations

A block of rooms is reserved for registrants until August 25, 2015, at a special rate of $199 plus tax, per night. If conference attendance exceeds expectations, rooms in the conference block may be sold out prior to this date.

Please Note: When making reservations online: After you click on “Book a Room” please manually choose your appropriate “travel dates” that you require. FYI - Conference runs Thursday, September 17 (starting at 3:30 p.m.) till Sunday, September 20, 2015 (ending at 11:30 a.m.).

Call for Proposals

For further information: Contact Mary Ellen Radjenovich, Conference Coordinator, (414) 955-8189 or meradjen@mcw.edu.

 Example of an abstract that meets the recommended guidelines

Primary care providers (PCP’s) are increasingly responsible for providing mental health care, but time constraints make a full, culturally-sensitive psychiatric interview difficult in daily practice. Physicians-in-training require a tool for a rapid, culturally-responsive psychiatric assessment that will quickly identify pertinent symptom clusters and distinguish between major psychological disorders. We will outline the important characteristics of such a tool, present an educational method for assisting residents in the development of their own tool for routine use, and outline the principles involved in incorporating a cultural assessment into the interview process. We will also discuss the ways in which Behavioral Scientists are uniquely equipped to teach residents this competency.

 Example of a session description that meets the guidelines for a lecture discussion

Primary care providers (PCP’s) are increasingly responsible for providing mental health care; over half of patients treated for a mental disorder receive some treatment for it in primary care (Russell, 2010), and the PCP is most commonly the sole provider of treatment (Wang, et al., 2006). However, the time constraints present in most primary care settings make a full psychiatric interview difficult in daily practice. Residents and physicians in practice also tend to struggle with incorporating patients’ unique psychosocial/cultural standpoint into their case conceptualization (Weissman et al., 2005). When these constraints are present, decision making can become hurried and failure to account for individual needs increases (Fiscella & Epstein, 2008). Physicians-in-training require a tool for a rapid, culturally-responsive psychiatric assessment that will quickly identify pertinent symptom clusters and distinguish between major psychological disorders. After introductions and rationale (10 min), presenters from two residency sites will discuss the important characteristics that such a tool should include, and provide some sample items that meet these criteria (10 min). Through role-playing we will demonstrate a process of helping residents identify the proper items for detecting and distinguishing psychological symptoms (10 min). We will also outline the principles involved in incorporating a cultural assessment into the interview process (10 min). Finally, we will discuss the ways in which Behavioral Scientists are uniquely equipped to teach residents this competency, an exercise designed to help with professional advancement and development (10 min). Time will be allowed for questions (10 min). Participants will leave with a framework and sample items for a rapid psychiatric assessment tool, an understanding of how to help residents develop their own personalized, culturally-sensitive tool for daily use, and confidence in their unique qualifications for this task involved in incorporating a cultural assessment into the interview process (10 min). Finally, we will discuss the ways in which Behavioral Scientists are uniquely equipped to teach residents this competency, an exercise designed to help with professional advancement and development (10 min). Time will be allowed

 The Forum encourages its attendees to visit these Web sites

American Academy on Communication in Healthcare - AACH
American Balint Society
Association for the Behavioral Sciences and Medical Education - ABSAME
Collaborative Family Healthcare Association - CFHA
Mindful Practice Workshop October 2015 (PDF)
Society of Teachers of Family Medicine

Contact Us

Dennis J. Butler, PhD, Program Chair, dbutler@mcw.edu

Mary Ellen Radjenovich, Conference Coordinator, (414) 955-8189 ormeradjen@mcw.edu

The FORUM is sponsored by The Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Family and Community Medicine in association with The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.

Medical College of Wisconsin
8701 Watertown Plank Road
Milwaukee, WI 53226
(414) 955-8296
Directions & Maps
© 2015

Page Updated 04/21/2015
Top