Medical Students

Teaching is a major focus for Department of Medicine (DOM) faculty and house staff. The Department's involvement in the medical school curriculum spans all four years and numerous activities. We take the Medical College of Wisconsin’s mission to develop the next generation of physicians to heart, continually striving to improve our educational programs and advance medical education as a whole.

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  M2 Clinical Examination & Reasoning (CER)

The Clinical Examination & Reasoning (CER) course is divided into three components. The first component consists of a series of half-day organ-based teaching modules which combine large group instruction (lecture/demonstration) and small group practice sessions. During some of these small group sessions, students examine each other; during others, they examine volunteer and/or standardized patients.

After completing the initial didactic portion of the course, students are assigned to work with a clinical preceptor for the History and Physical (H&P) component of the course. During the H&P session, students perform a minimum of four (4) comprehensive history and physical examinations and record their findings in a concise and logical manner. Records are then evaluated by the clinical preceptor to provide formative feedback. At the end of the course, students submit their "best" write-up to the course director for inclusion in the student's portfolio.

The Case Presentation and Clinical Reasoning (CPCR) component of CER divides students into groups of six (6) who work with a clinical preceptor to formulate and present clinical case presentations. Each student meets individually with their preceptor to obtain feedback and refine their presentation. Groups then meet as a whole for students to individually present their cases.

  M3 Internal Medicine Clerkship

The primary objective of the Internal Medicine Clerkship is to provide students with an intensive exposure to the practice of internal medicine in the inpatient setting. During the clerkship, students complete two one-month rotations on an inpatient general medicine ward service. Students receive teaching daily within the context of patient care and with emphasis on bedside teaching to facilitate learning while performing patient care.

The Internal Medicine Clerkship focuses on the basic competencies of general internal medicine, developing knowledge and skills in history and physical examination, diagnostic decision making, case presentation, communication and relationships with patients and colleagues, test interpretation, and therapeutic decision making. The clerkship follows national curricular objectives developed by a Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) working group.

  M4 Ambulatory Medicine

M4 students complete a one-month Ambulatory Medicine rotation blending outpatient general internal medicine, subspecialty clinics, and inpatient consultation service experiences. The Ambulatory Medicine clerkship allows students to continue to develop clinical skills and gain confidence in the diagnosis and management of medical problems commonly encountered in an adult ambulatory population. In addition, students develop skills in the application of preventive medicine principles and current practice guidelines for patients with common diagnoses including asthma, COPD, smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, back pain, and obesity.

Students are encouraged to use this month as an opportunity to prepare for internship and residency, especially in the following areas:

  • Become more independent in using clinical reasoning skills in diagnostic and therapeutic plan development.
  • Improve efficiency without detracting from detail-oriented and compassionate patient care.
  • Continue to refine medical communication skills including patient counseling, oral case presentations, and written documentation in the medical record.
  M4 General Medicine Acting Internship

All M4 students complete a one-month medically-based sub-internship in Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, or Family Medicine. The General Medicine Acting Internship allows students to master their history and physical examination skills, refine oral presentation skills, reinforce evaluation and management of common medical disorders, and practice communication skills including coordination of patient care discussions with ancillary staff and discussions with patients and their families regarding diagnoses, evaluation, and treatment options. In addition, students become familiar with triage and assessment of common cross-coverage issues, dictation/typing of discharge summaries, and performing procedures such as ABG, thoracentesis, and paracentesis under supervision.

Students are encouraged to use this month as an opportunity to prepare for internship and residency, especially in the following areas:

  • Become more independent in using clinical reasoning skills in diagnostic and therapeutic plan development.
  • Improve efficiency without detracting from detail-oriented and compassionate patient care.
  • Continue to refine medical communication skills including patient counseling, oral case presentations, and written documentation in the medical record.
  • Serve as a guide and role model to help teach junior students and peers on history taking, physical examination, and case assessment skills.
  M4 Medicine Electives

Students interested in internal medicine can choose from over 20 elective courses offered throughout the Department of Medicine's divisions. M4 electives are also open to visiting students.

Elective options for the 2012-13 academic year include:

Course Number, Course Title, Location

311-M4123, Cardiology Consults, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4117, Cardiology, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4124, Inpatient Cardiology, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4127, Endocrinology-Metabolism, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4128, Endocrinology/Diabetes, Endocrinology Center at North Hills

311-M4129, Endocrinology, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4131, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4132, Gastroenterology, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4187, Geriatric Medicine, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4134, Hematology/Oncology Consults, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4135, Hematology/Oncology, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4148, Inpatient Neoplastic Diseases, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4136, Outpatient Hematology/Oncology, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4138, Infectious Diseases, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4139, Infectious Diseases, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4137, Medical Consultation, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4208, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4209, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4144, Pulmonary Medicine Consults, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4145, Pulmonary Medicine, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4142, Nephrology Consults, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4143, Nephrology, Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4194, Inpatient Nephrology, Froedtert Hospital

311-M4147, Rheumatology, Froedtert Hospital/Zablocki VA Medical Center

311-M4120, Technology in Medicine: Telemedicine & Medical Informatics, Zablocki VA Medical Center

Medical Student Programs Faculty & Staff

Michael Frank, MDMichael Frank, MD

Vice Chair of Education
Residency Program Director
Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

Dr. Michael Frank joined MCW as an Associate Professor of Infectious Diseases in 1999. He became the Residency Program Director in 2004 and accepted the role of Vice Chair of Education in 2008.

Ankur Segon, MDAnkur Segon, MD

M4 General Medicine Acting Internship Director
Assistant Professor of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) - Hospitalist Program

Dr. Segon joined the MCW faculty in 2008 as a physician in our Hospitalist Program. In 2011, he assumed the role of Course Director for the M4 General Medicine Acting Internship. He finds interactions with medical students and residents as a source of enjoyment and satisfaction. Conversations with keen and receptive minds remind him of the reasons he got into medicine in the first place. As an educator, he is interested in highlighting the dynamism, intricacies, and rewards of medical problem solving and evidence-based practice. His focus is on framing facts of medical teaching in a problem-based context that simulates real-life scenarios and highlights impact on patient outcomes.

Dr. Segon believes teaching is more palatable when specific attempts are made to tailor experiences to the learners' level and understanding. He also believes in backing up teaching by evidence-based medicine to enhance learner receptivity. For Dr. Segon, it is crucial to cultivate a robust evaluation and feedback system and use it to modify both content and technique as appropriate. He says, "An involved group of learners that take something away from a teaching module or sessions is a source of satisfaction for me; if they also start to reflect on critical thinking and evidence-based medicine, it makes my day all the more rewarding and fulfilling."

Contact Us

Brooke Mbow
M3 Clerkship Coordinator
bmbow@mcw.edu

Jen Klumb MSEd
M4 Coordinator
General Medicine Acting Internship, Ambulatory Medicine, Visiting Students, and Medical Students as Teachers elective
jklumb@mcw.edu

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