Physician W Patient

Office of Global Health

Global Health Efforts in Africa

Democratic Republic of Congo

Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Non-communicable Diseases in Indigenous Populations

Dr. Egede and his team are focusing on the ways in which the social determinants of health have been shown to have an impact on the prevalence and management of a variety of non-communicable diseases. However, most of the research has been conducted in affluent populations, with very little done specifically in indigenous populations. Social determinants include conditions in which people are born, life, work, play, and age, and can be either protective or detrimental to health. As such, the goal of this project is to understand the role of culture, environment, social determinants, and genetics on the development, management, and care of non-communicable diseases in indigenous populations. This will be accomplished by collecting information from multiple indigenous populations to compare responses with minority groups in the United States, and to help understand the role of migration on health outcomes. Work will be conducted in Central America (Panama, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras) and East and Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda). The long-term goal of this research is to develop lifestyle interventions to improve health outcomes in indigenous populations.

 

International Research Ethics

Dr. Spellecy participates in IRB reviews for international research projects that have occurred in Cairo, Egypt.

 

Ethiopia

Cervical Cancer Prevention

Dr. Broekhuizen is a consultant and teacher in partnership with Pathfinders and the Ethiopian Ministry of Health for cervical cancer prevention.

 

St. Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College-MCW Institutional Affiliation Agreement

Dr. Dua is the faculty lead for the affiliation agreement between MCW and St. Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Signed in 2016, this agreement lays the groundwork for mutually beneficial educational opportunities and research partnerships between faculty, residents, and students from both institutions.

 

Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Non-communicable Diseases in Indigenous Populations

Dr. Egede and his team are focusing on the ways in which the social determinants of health have been shown to have an impact on the prevalence and management of a variety of non-communicable diseases. However, most of the research has been conducted in affluent populations, with very little done specifically in indigenous populations. Social determinants include conditions in which people are born, life, work, play, and age, and can be either protective or detrimental to health. As such, the goal of this project is to understand the role of culture, environment, social determinants, and genetics on the development, management, and care of non-communicable diseases in indigenous populations. This will be accomplished by collecting information from multiple indigenous populations to compare responses with minority groups in the United States, and to help understand the role of migration on health outcomes. Work will be conducted in Central America (Panama, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras) and East and Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda). The long-term goal of this research is to develop lifestyle interventions to improve health outcomes in indigenous populations.

 

Gabon

Pan-African Academy of Christian Surgeons (PAACS)

Dr. Robey participates with PAACS both as a Commission Board Member and a visiting teaching faculty member primarily in Gabon. PAACS trains surgical residents at multiple general surgery residencies, orthopedic surgery residencies, a pediatric surgery fellowship, and a head and neck surgery fellowship at various mission hospitals throughout Cameroon, Niger, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, and Gabon.

 

Ghana

West African College of Surgeons, Research Methods Workshop

Dr. Cassidy has conducted workshops on research methods in Kumasi, Ghana.

 

Management of Trauma

Dr. Decker collaborates with Africa Partners Medical and Linda Caples, Director of Continuing and Professional Education at MCW, to do work in the field of management of trauma in Emergency Medicine and research in educational outcomes.

 

Educational Outcomes Research

Linda Caples is the Director of Continuing and Professional Education at MCW. She partners with the Ghana College of Physicians & Surgeons to do research on educational outcomes in continuing medical education.

 

ATLS Training

Dr. Dodgion is assisting with development of an ATLS training program and trauma care model for Wenchi Hospital in Ghana. This will serve as a template for countrywide expansion. Additionally, they are performing a trauma care needs assessment to guide future collaborations.

 

Kenya

AMPATH - Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret Kenya - Otolaryngology Experience

Dr. Campbell is part of a group that travels to MTRH in Eldoret, Kenya every February to teach surgical procedures to local otolaryngologists. There are clinical research projects being developed as well.

 

Surgical Service

Dr. Siddiqui performed pediatric and general surgical relief efforts in Migori, Kenya in support of Nairobi's Children Center.

 

Hemostasis Laboratory Set-Up in Kenya

Dr. Montgomery assisted in setting up a Hemostasis Laboratory at Moi University Medical Center in Eldoret, Kenya.

 

Clinical Care and Teaching in Kenya

Dr. Sanchez volunteers with a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team at Tenwek Mission Hospital in Bomet, Kenya where she teaches trainees and provides infectious disease consultation. The team works in collaboration with World Medical Mission, the medical arm of Samaritan's Purse.

Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Non-communicable Diseases in Indigenous Populations

Dr. Egede and his team are focusing on the ways in which the social determinants of health have been shown to have an impact on the prevalence and management of a variety of non-communicable diseases. However, most of the research has been conducted in affluent populations, with very little done specifically in indigenous populations. Social determinants include conditions in which people are born, life, work, play, and age, and can be either protective or detrimental to health. As such, the goal of this project is to understand the role of culture, environment, social determinants, and genetics on the development, management, and care of non-communicable diseases in indigenous populations. This will be accomplished by collecting information from multiple indigenous populations to compare responses with minority groups in the United States, and to help understand the role of migration on health outcomes. Work will be conducted in Central America (Panama, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras) and East and Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda). The long-term goal of this research is to develop lifestyle interventions to improve health outcomes in indigenous populations.

 

Liberia

West African College of Surgeons, Research Methods Workshop

Dr. Cassidy has conducted workshops on research methods in Monrovia, Liberia.

 

Use of High-Dose Selenium in Ebola Patients

Dr. Sieber advised the Liberian government and health care providers on correct use of selenium in Ebola patients during the 2014 Ebola crisis.

 

A Sedation Curriculum for Liberian Pediatric Providers (SCLiPP)

Dr. Schultz's project proposes to develop and implement a training module for pediatric providers in Liberia on how to safely use ketamine for procedural sedation in children. Currently there is no formalized training in Liberia to teach medical providers how to safely perform procedural sedation in children.

 

Nigeria

Study of Primary Tooth Eruption in Children with HIV

Dr. Szabo, in partnership with a Nigerian researcher and faculty from the Marquette School of Dentistry, is planning a study and grant application to examine the effect of antiretroviral medication exposure in utero and in infancy on primary tooth eruption and tooth mineralization in children with HIV.

 

Breast Cancer Surgery in Nigeria

Dr. Shah-Khan evaluated women with breast concerns as part of a medical mission to Anambra State in Nigeria. She operated on benign and malignant breast disease, provided education on screening to patients, trained community members and local nurses, and coordinated with local providers for follow-up care and adjuvant therapy.

 

Nigerian Trauma Registry

Dr. Cassidy developed and manages a Nigerian Trauma Registry with data entered by healthcare professionals from multiple hospitals in Abuja and Zaria, Nigeria. The information is used to keep record and assess trauma cases. Dr. Cassidy is a co-author of the article “Injury Experience Using the Nigerian Trauma Registry” in the Journal of Registry Management which uses data from the trauma registry.

 

West African College of Surgeons, Research Methods Workshop

Dr. Cassidy has conducted workshops on research methods in Abuja, Nigeria; Lagos, Nigeria; Monrovia, Liberia, Kumasi, Ghana.

 

Research Collaboration in Nigeria

Dr. Kumar participated in collaborative research and data collection and analysis with Fullbright sponsored visiting scientist to University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Lagos, Nigeria.

 

Rwanda

Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Non-communicable Diseases in Indigenous Populations

Dr. Egede and his team are focusing on the ways in which the social determinants of health have been shown to have an impact on the prevalence and management of a variety of non-communicable diseases. However, most of the research has been conducted in affluent populations, with very little done specifically in indigenous populations. Social determinants include conditions in which people are born, life, work, play, and age, and can be either protective or detrimental to health. As such, the goal of this project is to understand the role of culture, environment, social determinants, and genetics on the development, management, and care of non-communicable diseases in indigenous populations. This will be accomplished by collecting information from multiple indigenous populations to compare responses with minority groups in the United States, and to help understand the role of migration on health outcomes. Work will be conducted in Central America (Panama, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras) and East and Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda). The long-term goal of this research is to develop lifestyle interventions to improve health outcomes in indigenous populations.

 

Senegal

Development of Neurology Education and Practice in the Developing World

This project aims to help the practice of neurology, establishment of residency programs, research projects and organization of CME programs in 34 developing countries. The World Neurology Foundation of which Dr. Antuono is the secretary treasurer, has programs in 34 countries.

 

Sierra Leone

Research in Sierra Leone

Dr. Cassidy is involved in a variety of research projects in Sierra Leone related to traumatic injuries, surgery and mortality, burns, and the burden of musculoskeletal disease. The results of these studies have been published in Lancet, JAMA Surgery, World Journal of Surgery, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, and Burns.

 

Tanzania

Development of Pharmacology Curriculum in Tanzania

Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMC) located in Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania lost their Pharmacology faculty, and Professor Leszek Wojnowski in Mainz, Germany, organized an international effort to develop the entire medical pharmacology curriculum by lecture podcasts. Dr. Charles Myers and other colleagues of MCW’s Pharmacology and Toxicology Department have provided approximately one-third of their entire course materials, including lecture handouts, PowerPoints and audio. These are made available to KCMC students. Dr. Myers has submitted questions for exams and practiced exams that Professor Wojnowski organizes. Their efforts have been recognized as a model for developing and advancing Pharmacology education elsewhere in the world where resources and expertise are scarce.

 

Building Capacity in Family Medicine in Tanzania

Dr. Sanders works with the Aga Khan Hospital System, the Ministry of Health, and a newly established interfaith hospital to expand the training of Family Medicine physicians in Tanzania.

 

Tanzania Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medical Services Consultation

Dr. Weston works with health professionals and government officials in Tanzania to aid in the development and enhancement of their emergency medical systems. This involves a collaboration with Tanzanians visiting the United States and vice versa to aid in mutual development.

 

Government of Tanzania-MCW Affiliation Agreement

Dr. Hargarten is the faculty lead for the affiliation agreement between MCW and the Government of Tanzania. Signed in 2016, this agreement lays the groundwork for to strengthen Tanzania's capabilities in the area of Emergency Medical Services, and for mutually beneficial educational opportunities and research partnerships between faculty, residents, and students.

 

Clinical Care in Otolaryngology

Dr. Campbell has worked to initiate education and training partnership opportunities with the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center (KCMC)/Hospital and the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College (KCMCo) in Moshi to advance training in Otolaryngology. He also provides an overview of the country and healthcare system to medical students who are going to conduct a global health elective Tanzania.

 

Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Non-communicable Diseases in Indigenous Populations

Dr. Egede and his team are focusing on the ways in which the social determinants of health have been shown to have an impact on the prevalence and management of a variety of non-communicable diseases. However, most of the research has been conducted in affluent populations, with very little done specifically in indigenous populations. Social determinants include conditions in which people are born, life, work, play, and age, and can be either protective or detrimental to health. As such, the goal of this project is to understand the role of culture, environment, social determinants, and genetics on the development, management, and care of non-communicable diseases in indigenous populations. This will be accomplished by collecting information from multiple indigenous populations to compare responses with minority groups in the United States, and to help understand the role of migration on health outcomes. Work will be conducted in Central America (Panama, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras) and East and Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda). The long-term goal of this research is to develop lifestyle interventions to improve health outcomes in indigenous populations.

 

Uganda

Pediatric Resident Global Health Education

Dr. Kaeppler supports the Pediatric Global Health Track which provides Pediatrics and Medicine/Pediatrics Residents with opportunities to develop and learn global health medicine at home and abroad. In Uganda, the elective for medical students and residents is with A.T.L.A.S., a rural NGO that affiliates with multiple clinical partners in southeastern Uganda.

 

Faculty Advising in the Public and Community Health Program

Dr. Cassidy was the faculty advisor for Joseph Byonanebye. He was a student in the Public and Community Health PhD program whose dissertation was on the characteristics, regional trends, and determinants of teenage pregnancy in Uganda. He graduated in 2017.

 

Research and Education Partnership

Dr. Beyer, in her role as Associate Director for the PhD Program in Public and Community Health, is working with Program Director Dr. Laura Cassidy in building a partnership with colleagues at the Makerere University School of Public Health in Kampala, Uganda, including research collaborations.

 

Makerere University School of Public Health-MCW Institutional Agreement

Dr. Cassidy is the faculty lead for the institutional affiliation agreement between MCW and Makerere University School of Public Health in Kampala, Uganda. Signed in 2017, this agreement lays the groundwork to stimulate scientific cooperation and strengthen research, teaching and patient care, broaden international experiences, and promote cross-cultural knowledge. Both Dr. Cassidy and Dr. Kirsten Beyer have been appointed External Examiners for Post Graduate Programs in the School of Public Health, College of Sciences at Makerere University.

 

External Examiner for Post Graduate Programs, Makerere University School of Public Health

Dr. Beyer and Dr. Laura Cassidy have been appointed External Examiners for Post Graduate Programs in the School of Public Health, College of Sciences at Makerere University.

 

Impact of Social Determinants of Health on Non-communicable Diseases in Indigenous Populations

Dr. Egede and his team are focusing on the ways in which the social determinants of health have been shown to have an impact on the prevalence and management of a variety of non-communicable diseases. However, most of the research has been conducted in affluent populations, with very little done specifically in indigenous populations. Social determinants include conditions in which people are born, life, work, play, and age, and can be either protective or detrimental to health. As such, the goal of this project is to understand the role of culture, environment, social determinants, and genetics on the development, management, and care of non-communicable diseases in indigenous populations. This will be accomplished by collecting information from multiple indigenous populations to compare responses with minority groups in the United States, and to help understand the role of migration on health outcomes. Work will be conducted in Central America (Panama, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Honduras) and East and Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Uganda). The long-term goal of this research is to develop lifestyle interventions to improve health outcomes in indigenous populations.

 

Zambia

Clinical Care in Zambia

Dr. Klehm is working with a local mission hospital in Mwandi, Zambia to provide much needed care in their 30 bed hospital. A large focus of the hospital is that half of the admissions which are HIV related. Other efforts include community outreach and immunizations in adjacent areas. They have also been able to provide computer access to the area, facilitating access to health care resources.

 

Developing Family Medicine in Zambia

Dr. Sanders works with the University of Zambia's residency program in varied and ongoing ways including the development of their curriculum for post-graduate training of Family Medicine residents (approved in 2014).

 

M4 Elective in Zambia

Dr. Sanders leads this M4 elective in partnership with the University of Zambia School of Medicine. Students are exposed to the distribution and determinants of disease in urban and rural Zambia. They learn about the systems by which preventative, primary, and curative care health services are organized and delivered.

 

Zimbabwe

International Surgical Trip

Dr. Fons was a pediatric anesthesiologist during an international surgical trip to Zimbabwe with LEAP in 2016.