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Certificate in Clinical & Translational Science

The Certificate in Clinical and Translational Science curriculum is designed for healthcare professionals, clinical investigators, and other individuals interested in gaining additional knowledge and skills in the field. Students completing the Certificate will select from one of four emphasis tracks. The Certificate is designed to be completed in one year but can be completed part-time in up to two years. 
CTS Cert_Intro Card

Message from the Director

Leonard Egede, MD, MSLeonard Egede, MD, MS

Director, MS in Clinical & Translational Science

legede@mcw.edu
(414) 805-0840

There is a growing recognition that the clinical and translational research workforce remains inadequate to answer the challenges of our healthcare system. On average, it takes 17 years to move a scientific discovery into clinical practice.1 The opportunities for participating in the innovation happening from “bench to bedside” is growing, and a new translational gap of “bedside to community” has opened up. We re-designed our Master’s of Science in Clinical and Translational Science program to directly fill those gaps and train the next generation of health care professionals, clinical investigators, and research scientists for a career at any point along the translational continuum. We also specifically designed 4 new Certificates that offer a structured training opportunity to those who want to learn more about the field and gain additional knowledge and research skills, rather than obtain an MS degree.

To date we have graduated 130 clinical and translational research scientists, including 111 from the Master’s program, 14 Certificate, and 5 MD/MS dual degree students. Our graduates are working in a diversity of workplaces including the Medical College of Wisconsin, pharmaceutical companies, and a multitude of medical centers across the United States. We welcome you to join our program and learn the foundations of translational research, clinical statistics, epidemiology, ethics and safety, and study designs across the translational continuum. Degree candidates will then select one of four tracks and complete a thesis, after completion of core and elective courses. As a Certificate student you would select an emphasis track and complete four courses with our degree students to provide foundational material and research skills specific to your interests. We invite you to browse the curriculum outline, emphasis tracks, and course schedule as you consider our program. We believe our scientific and medical workforce will benefit from trainees with a diversity of backgrounds, prior training, interests, and career plans, so we aim to incorporate discussion and debate into many of our courses. We also believe that a well-trained and dedicated workforce can meet the needs of our healthcare system, so we value scientific rigor and excellence.

The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) is one of the largest private medical schools in the United States, and the only academic medical center in southeastern Wisconsin. As an institution that values education, research, clinical care, and community engagement, we are an ideal location to learn clinical and translational research skills that span the full translational continuum. Please feel free to contact our program staff for further information, and we look forward to your application!

1 Green et al. Am J of Public Health, 2009.

Clinical & Translational Science Certificate Program

About the Program

About the Program

The certificate program is designed for individuals who want additional training but may not want to pursue a full master’s degree and for those who have already completed professional clinical training but would like additional training in clinical and translational research.

The certificate is designed to be completed within one (1) academic year, and students have up to two (2) calendar years to complete all requirements. Students completing the certificate will have the option to transfer up to 12 credits into the Master’s of Clinical and Translational Science degree program. Students wishing to take this route will need to apply to the Master’s program and would be able to start in fall of the following academic year.

Additional program information is available on the CTSI website.

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Certificate Curriculum

Certificate Curriculum

Emphasis Tracks 

When applying for the Certificate, potential students will select from one of the following emphasis tracks: 

1. Translational Science
This track is focused on the foundational principles of the translational process. This “bench-to-bedside” process involves moving discoveries from their basic foundation to clinical settings. Discoveries of focus include diagnostics, therapeutics, medical procedures, and other interventions.

2. Population Science
There are a variety of factors that can influence health outcomes at a population level, and this track will focus on the relationship between these factors, health, and research. This program will focus on factors such as socioeconomic status, health disparities, social determinants of health, healthcare systems, environment, and policies.

3. Health System Science
The focus of this track is on principles and processes within the healthcare system. The topics of focus will include delivery of healthcare, how healthcare professionals work together, and improvements that can be made within the system to improve healthcare delivery.

4. Community Based Science
This track is focused on engaging the community in research being conducted near the end of the translational spectrum. Emphasis is placed on collaboration with community members and organizations to promote engagement in developing community-wide approaches to improve health for all. 

Courses 
The Certificate in Clinical and Translational Science is 12 credit hours. Every student will complete the same foundational courses in Clinical & Translational Science, Statistics, and Foundations of Health Services Research. 

 CTS CERT Table
Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

Core Courses

20101 Introduction to Clinical and Translational Science     3 credit hours. Fall 
The course will provide the student with a broad understanding of clinical translational science. By the end of the course the student will be able to understand key concepts underlying translational research including methods used to move basic science discoveries to clinical practice and enhancing the health of the public through the provision of evidence-based care. Coursework will include weekly reading of peer reviewed manuscripts, assignments, and a final project. Weekly classes will include discussion of reading and assignments are designed to allow practice of critically reading and planning translational science projects. The course will meet once per week for a total of 18 weeks.

20220 Clinical Statistics I. 3 credit hours. Fall 
This is an introductory course in evidence discovery that demonstrates the concepts and application of statistical techniques/tools, given the role of statistics as an information science. The course is intended to inform and provide quantitative skills for graduate students interested in undertaking research in clinical medicine, epidemiology, public health, translational and biomedical sciences. This course emphasizes the basic dogma of statistics namely the central tendency theorem as well as sampling as the core of statistics. With the characterization of statistics as descriptive and inferential, the descriptive arm of statistics is stressed in this course namely summary statistics. Basic probability concepts are covered to stress the importance of sampling prior to reliable inference from the sample data. Sample estimation of the population and the precision (confidence interval) are described as well as the hypothesis testing notion in inferential statistics. The parametric and non-parametric methods are introduced with the intent to describe the methods as applicable to continuous (ratio, interval, cardinal) and discrete (categorical binary, dichotomous) data. 

20160 Foundations in Health Services Research.    3 credit hours. Spring 
The course will provide the student with a broad understanding of health services research design and methodology, as well as provide the student with the opportunity to engage in a mentored, individualized, in-depth study experience. By the end of the course the student will be able to understand key theories that serve as the foundation of health services research and understand the process of developing a research idea and translating it into an R-series level NIH proposal. Coursework will include weekly reading of peer-reviewed manuscripts, one introductory textbook on health services research, and one introductory textbook on designing clinical research. Weekly classes will include discussion of reading and assignments are designed to allow practice of critically reading and planning health services research projects. 

Suggested Electives

20262 Introduction to Health Economics. 3 credit hours. Fall 
The course is an introduction to health economics both theoretical and applied. By the end of the course the student will be able to understand the basics of health economics including the principles and research methodology used to apply economic concepts to the health field. Coursework will include weekly reading of peer-reviewed manuscripts and one introductory textbooks on health care economics.  Weekly classes will include discussion of reading and course projects are designed to allow practice of critically reading and conducting health economic research. 
Emphasis Track(s) suggested for: Population Science, Health Systems Science

20120 Introduction to Health Disparities Research 3 credit hours. Fall 
The course is an introduction to health disparities. By the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the relationship between inequities in social determinants of health and health outcomes in various populations. Coursework will include weekly readings from one textbook on multicultural medicine and health disparities as well as peer-reviewed articles to demonstrate the concepts in real-world experiences. Weekly classes will include discussion of the readings. Course projects will be assigned and are designed to allow practice of critically reading and appraising the literature related to applied health disparities research and also to understand the theoretical bases for health equity research. The course will meet once per week for a total of 18 weeks. 
Emphasis Track(s) suggested for: Community Based Science

20241 Translational Genomics.
3 credit hours. Spring
The primary goal of this course is to teach students how to develop a research program to ask relevant genetic questions in the clinical setting utilizing the molecular genetics toolbox. To this end, students will be provided with background in molecular genetics strategies and study designs as well as an understanding of common genetics questions emanating from the clinic so that they will be better able to make connections between bench and bedside. In addition, they will be challenged to think creatively and through a translational focus during course‐long case studies and group projects. 
Emphasis Track(s) suggested for: Translational Science

20260 Introduction to Dissemination and Implementation Science. 3 credit hours. Spring
The course is an introduction to dissemination and implementation and science research methods both theoretical and applied. By the end of the course the student will be able to understand the science of dissemination and implementation, and applied methods for dissemination and implementation. Coursework will include weekly reading of peer-reviewed manuscripts and one introductory textbooks on dissemination and implementation science.  Weekly classes will include discussion of reading and course projects are designed to allow practice of critically reading and planning implementation research. 
Emphasis Track(s) suggested for: Health Systems Science, Community Based Science

 
Admissions

Admissions

The Certificate in CTS program application cycle is open from January – July. Applications will be reviewed and admission decisions will be made on a rolling basis. Students are only admitted once per year to start in the Fall semester.

Before applying students are encouraged to ensure they meet the minimum requirements: 

  • Baccalaureate degree - official transcripts required
  • 3.0 cumulative GPA preferred
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Personal statement describing reasons for interest in the program and career goals
  • Strong foundation in quantitative or biological sciences
  • TOEFL scores for students who do not use English as their primary language of communication is required. A TOEFL score of 100 or higher is deal, the Institution Code is 1519.

Note that the GRE is not required for program admission. 

 
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Faculty

Faculty

A list of faculty and their bios can be is available on the Faculty Bios & Research page.
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Tuition and Fees

Tuition and Fees

If you have questions regarding tuition or your account, please contact the Office of Student Accounts, at (414) 955-8172 or mcwtuition@mcw.edu. Please refer to the All Student Handbook (PDF) for tuition payment policies and information.

Masters, Certificate & Non-Degree Students
Students seeking financial aid for MPH, MS or MA degree programs, visit the Financial Aid Office website.

Current MCW Employees
Tuition Course Approval Form - Human Resources (PDF)

Late Fees
There will be a $100 late registration fee for anyone not completing registration by the date indicated on the schedule each semester.

There is also a $250 late payment fee for tuition not paid on time according to the Tuition Payments policy in the All Student Handbook (PDF).

Late payment fee is in addition to any late registration fee.

Contact Us

MCW Graduate School
8701 Watertown Plank Rd.
Milwaukee, WI 53226

(414) 955-8218
(414) 955-0084 (fax)
gradschool@mcw.edu

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