Corporate Policies and Procedures
Administrative (AD)

Prohibition on Sex Discrimination and Related Misconduct

Category:

Policy#:

Applies To:

Conduct and Conflicts (CC)

AD.CC.080

All Employees (Faculty, Exempt and Non-Exempt Staff, Post-Doctoral Fellows), Students, and Third Parties

Purpose

The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) complies with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (commonly referred to as the Clery Act). MCW prohibits sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, and maintains procedures for reporting the same.

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  Definitions

Annual Campus Security Report (ACSR): Defined as MCW’s Annual Campus Security Report. This information, prepared in compliance with the Clery Act, outlines MCW's security policies and discloses campus crime statistics for the three most recent calendar years. An electronic copy may be obtained on the MCW Public Safety website. A paper copy of this document may be obtained by contacting the Medical College of Wisconsin, Public Safety, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226 or by calling (414) 955-8295.

In addition to the information contained in this Report, current MCW policies and procedures are published on the Corporate Policies webpage, in the Administrative Policies and Procedures, Staff Employee Handbook, Graduate Student Handbook and the Medical Student Handbook.

Bystander Intervention: Safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there exists any act (or risk thereof) of sex discrimination, sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking.

Campus Security Authority (CSA): A Clery Act specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with an institution.

  • A campus police department or a campus security department of an institution.
     
  • Any individual or individuals who are responsible for campus security but who do not constitute a campus police department or a campus security department (e.g., an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance into institutional property).
  • Any individual or organization specified in an institution’s statement of campus security policy as an individual or organization to which students and employees should report criminal offenses.
  • An official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including but not limited to student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings. An official is defined as any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the institution.

Clery Act: The Clery Act requires institutions to disclose three general categories of crime statistics:

  • Criminal Offenses
  • Hate Crimes
  • Arrests and Referrals for Disciplinary Action for Liquor, Drug & Weapon Law Offenses.

The definitions of these crimes are taken from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook (UCR) (PDF) as required by the Clery Act.

Complainant: Individual who alleges under this policy to be the victim of sex discrimination, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and/or stalking.

Conduct without Consent: Conduct is considered without consent if no clear consent, verbal or nonverbal, is given. Non-consensual contact is any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object, by a person upon another person, that is without consent and/or by force.

Coercion: Coercion occurs when a person is persuaded to do something by force or use of threats or intimidation. For the purposes of this policy, coercing someone into sexual activity violates this policy in the same way as physically forcing someone into a sexual act.

Confidential Resources: People and organizations that are not required to notify the Title IX Coordinator after receiving a report of a Prohibited Offense from an MCW student, employee or Third Party. Appropriate Confidential Resources will submit anonymous statistical information for Clery Act purposes unless they believe it would be harmful to the individual or are prevented from doing so by law, rule or regulation. The following MCW Confidential Resources will not engage the Title IX Coordinator with identifiable information unless the reporting party grants permission for the same, and/or the Confidential Resource determines a danger to other(s) is reasonably believed to exist:

  • The Employee Assistance Program (available to employees and students);
     
  • Health care providers, including mental health providers, in their capacities of providing clinical care to students and employees;
     
  • The MCW Ombuds Office, when the Ombuds person is serving in that capacity; note that the Ombuds Office only provides services to employees, and also accepts anonymous reports from employees; and
     
  • The MCW Compliance Hotline, which accepts reports from anonymous and identified individuals.

The following Confidential Resources external to MCW have no obligation to engage MCW (this list is not exhaustive):

  • Community Rape Crisis Center;
  • Community Domestic Violence resources; and
  • Community members of the clergy.

Consent: Words or overt actions by a person who is competent and coherent to give informed consent indicating a freely given agreement to have sexual intercourse, sexual contact or engage in other activities sexual in nature. Wis. Stat. 940.225(4) Previously welcome conduct does not constitute consent for similar or identical conduct in the future.

Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the following factors: the length of the relationship; the type of the relationship; and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

For the purposes of this definition, Dating Violence includes but is not limited to sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse, but does not include acts included in the definition of Domestic Violence.

Domestic Violence: An act of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

MCW expects students and employees to comply with Wisconsin law, which defines domestic abuse to include any of the following engaged in by an adult person against his or her spouse or former spouse, against an adult with whom the person resides or formerly resided or against an adult with whom the person has a child in common:

  1. Intentional infliction of physical pain, physical injury or illness.
     
  2. Intentional impairment of physical condition.
     
  3. A violation of Wis. Stat. 940.225(1), (2) or (3)
     
  4. A physical act that may cause the other person reasonably to fear imminent engagement in the conduct described above.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): 20 U.S.C. 1232g; 34 C.F.R. Part 99; a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. This law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.

Force: Force is the use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access and includes threats, intimidation, and coercion that overcome resistance or produce consent.

Gender Identity: for purposes of this policy, gender identity is the gender role (such as male or female) with which an individual self-identifies, regardless of whether that role is consistent with the gender role assigned to the person at birth.

Hostile Environment: environment which can result from misconduct under this policy sufficiently serious such that it interferes with or limits the ability to participate in or benefit from MCW’s programs (working or learning), or creates an intimidating, threatening or abusive educational environment. A hostile environment can be created by an employee, student, or others such as a visiting student.

Preponderance of the Evidence: standard used to determine whether a complaint of a Prohibited Offense is "more likely than not" (or 51% or more) to have occurred.

Prohibited Offenses: Sex discrimination, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking (as those terms are defined herein).

Respondent: Individual who is alleged to have committed or engaged in a Prohibited Offense (i.e. a violation(s) of this policy).

Responsible Employees: Employees that are required to promptly notify and engage the MCW Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator any time they receive a report of violation(s) of this policy. All MCW employees meet this definition with the exception of those employees that are Confidential Resources, contracted workers, and Standardized Patients.

Sexual Assault: Any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs by coercion, force or without consent of the recipient. Included in the definition of sexual assault are non-consensual sexual intercourse, non-consensual sexual contact, incest and statutory rape. This definition includes sexual acts against people who are unable to consent either due to age or lack of capacity.

  • Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse: Penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the recipient. Intercourse incudes vaginal or anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger, and oral copulation (mouth and genital contact) no matter how slight the penetration or contact. Non-consensual sexual intercourse may also be known as rape.
     
  • Non-Consensual Sexual Contact or attempt to commit the same: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purposes of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. Non-consensual sexual contact may also be referred to as fondling or groping.
     
  • Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
     
  • Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse by a person at or over the statutory age of consent with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Wisconsin state law defines sexual assault under Sec. 940.225 Wis. Stats.

Sex Discrimination: Treating an individual unfavorably based on their sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity.  Forms of sex discrimination include but are not limited to sex-based harassment, violence, assault, exploitation, coercion and stalking.

Sexual Exploitation: Taking non-consensual and/or abusive sexual advantage of another for the perpetrator’s own advantage or benefit. Forms of sexual exploitation include invasion of sexual privacy, taking and/or sharing non-consensual images, videos, audio-tapes or other media of sexual activity of or with another person(s), knowingly transmitting a sexually transmitted disease, exposing one’s genitals in a non-consensual circumstance, engaging in voyeurism, and gender identity or sex-based bullying.

Sexual Harassment: Unwelcome gender or sexual based verbal or physical contact such as sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or nonverbal, visual or physical conduct of a gender or sexual nature, such as comments, touching, teasing, joking or displaying sexually explicit materials or other behaviors that unreasonably interfere with work, academic or school-related activities. Sexual Harassment is a serious violation of this policy and is prohibited.

Harassment occurs:

  • whenever submission to such conduct is based on power differentials and is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment, academic or school-related activities,
     
  • whenever submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as a basis for decisions, and/or
     
  • when such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with an individual's performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work, academic or school-related environment.

Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; and/or suffer substantial emotional distress.

For the purposes of this definition course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

Wisconsin law prohibits stalking under Section 940.32 Wis. Stats.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972: Enforced by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, Title IX protects people from sex discrimination in education programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance. Title IX specifically states: "no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance."

Third Party: a Complainant or Respondent who is not an MCW faculty member, staff member or student.

Violence against Women Act (VAWA): Is a broad-based law formulated in 1994 in response to the increasing violence against women in America. In 2013, this law amended section 485(f) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA), otherwise known as the Clery Act. VAWA contains provisions ranging from funding of domestic violence programs to new civil rights remedies for female victims of gender-based attacks.

VAWA provides for education, research, treatment of domestic and sex-crime victims, creation of rape crisis centers and battered women's shelters. VAWA also authorizes additional local police, prosecutors, victim advocates, and a domestic violence hotline to check the increasing violence. It distributed funds to increase safety for women on public transportation, for shelters, and for youth education programs. Funds were also made available to provide special training for judges who hear domestic violence cases. VAWA in short expanded rape shield laws, created offenses for interstate spousal abuse, and allowed victims of gender-based crimes to sue those responsible in federal court.

  Policy

MCW is committed to creating and sustaining a safe learning and working environment that recognizes and values the dignity of all members of the MCW community, which includes faculty, staff, students and visitors. In furtherance of this commitment and as more fully described herein, MCW prohibits in all work, education and other programs, sex discrimination, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. To be clear, sex discrimination includes sexual harassment, sexual violence, and discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and/or gender identity.

Retaliation against any individual making a report under this policy or any individual participating in an investigation in connection with this policy is prohibited.

MCW recognizes and emphasizes that compliance with Title IX and VAWA does not constitute a violation of FERPA.

This policy applies to sex discrimination, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and/or stalking that occur on campus or in connection with an MCW program or event. This policy also applies external to MCW or an MCW program or event (such as off-campus, non-MCW related activities) if continuing effects of the conduct in MCW programs, events or on MCW premises violate this policy, for example by creating a hostile environment on-campus for the Complainant or others. All MCW faculty, staff, students and visitors are subject to this policy and are encouraged to utilize the protections and processes set forth herein, regardless of their sex, sexual orientation or gender identity.

In the event MCW receives a report that a member of the MCW faculty, staff or study body is alleged to have committed a prohibited offense, and regardless of the complainant’s or respondent’s sex, gender, sexual orientation, or gender identity, MCW will promptly investigate the allegation in accordance with the MCW Investigations into Sexual Discrmination and Related Misconduct Policy (AD.CC.090). The Anti-Harassment and Non-Discrimination Policy will be used if the reported sex discrimination is made by an employee and does not involve a student.

All individuals who believe they have been subjected to or accused of sex discrimination and other related misconduct are encouraged to and have a right to seek support, utilize available resources, and report their concerns or complaint.

Education and Prevention Programs

MCW seeks to prevent, address and end sex discrimination and VAWA crimes by engaging in comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns that:

  • Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research, or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and
     
  • Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community and societal levels.

MCW has developed and implemented educational programming, consisting of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees, and ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns and training for students and employees. These programs and campaigns:

  1. Identify and define sex discrimination and examples thereof.
     
  2. Identify sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking as conduct prohibited by MCW.
     
  3. Define using definitions provided both by the Department of Education as well as state law as to what behavior constitutes sex discrimination, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.
     
  4. Define what behavior and actions constitute consent to sexual activity in the state of Wisconsin.
     
  5. Provide a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention.
     
  6. Provide information on risk reduction. Risk reduction means decreasing potential for perpetration or bystander inaction, while increasing empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to enable individuals and communities improve conditions that facilitate violence.

For additional information on MCW’s campus educational programs concerning sex discrimination, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking, contact the Title IX Coordinator, a Title IX Deputy Coordinator, the Office of Human Resources, Academic Affairs, the Graduate School and/or Public Safety. See the MCW Sexual Misconduct/Title IX Website.

  Procedure

After an incident

After an incident involving a Prohibited Offense, MCW strongly recommends the victim do each of the following:

  1. Get to a safe place.
     
  2. Seek medical attention as soon as possible. For urgent medical needs, call 911 (9-911 from an MCW campus telephone), or go directly to the nearest hospital emergency room. Post-assault medical care for emergency and non-emergency cases can be performed at a local hospital emergency department.

    Many hospitals have specialized examiners who can complete an exam for victims of sexual violence. Such an exam can help the victim receive appropriate medical treatment and preserve evidence for possible future action. If victims do not opt for forensic evidence collection, health care providers can still treat injuries and take steps to address concerns of pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted diseases.
     
  3. Preserve physical evidence. It is important a victim of sexual violence not bathe, douche, smoke, change clothing or clean the bed/linen/area where they were assaulted (if the assault occurred within the past 96 hours). Place items in a paper bag for possible future action. Also, keep copies of voicemail messages, text messages, instant messages, social networking pages, pictures, emails and any other relevant documents.  It is important to note that as time passes, evidence of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking may dissipate or otherwise change to a degree it no longer serves as evidence of the crime in question. This could render investigation, prosecution, disciplinary proceedings, or obtaining legal orders for protection from abuse much more difficult.

    In instances of sexual assault, even if the victim does not want to collect evidence or pursue a legal action against the alleged perpetrator, health care providers can still help the victim address concerns like pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases.

Reporting Procedures

Responsible Employees must engage the Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator without delay following receipt of a report of a Prohibited Offense.

Other individuals who witness or experience a Prohibited Offense (such as a bystander or victim) are strongly encouraged to report the same. Reporting procedures for all individuals are as follows:

  • Faculty, staff and students should report to the MCW Title IX Coordinator or a Title IX Deputy Coordinator, all of whom are listed along with contact information on the MCW Sexual Misconduct/Title IX webpage. The Title IX Coordinator’s contact information is: Katie Kassulke, (414) 955-8668, TitleIXCoordinator@mcw.edu.;
     
  • Faculty and staff may also report to the Office of Human Resources or to their immediate supervisor, manager and Department Administrator, Division Chief, or Department Chair.
     
  • Students may also make a report to the Dean in the student’s school.
     
  • MCW Compliance Line – 1 (866) 857-4943 (reports may but are not required to be provided anonymously)
     
  • The Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education (OCR) enforces Title IX. In addition to the resources above, inquiries and complaints under Title IX may be directed to ocr@edu.gov, or to the local OCR office (call 1 (800) 421-3481 for local office information).

Third Parties, including students from other institutions and individuals participating in MCW programs or on MCW premises, may report as follows:

  • MCW Title IX Coordinator
  • Police
  • MCW Office of Public Safety
  • Compliance Hotline
  • OCR

See the above section and the Title IX / Sexual Misconduct webpage for contact information.

Note: reporting a Prohibited Offense to an individual acting in their capacity as a Confidential Resource does not constitute, and will not result in, notice of the Prohibited Offense to MCW.

Reporting parties may wish to consider carefully whether to share personally identifiable details with Responsible Employees who are not Confidential Resources, as the Responsible Employee receiving the information must share those details with the Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator. If a reporting party does not wish for their name to be shared, does not wish for an investigation to take place, or does not want a non-investigative resolution to be pursued, the reporting party should communicate that request to the Responsible Employee, Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator, who will evaluate the request in light of the duty to ensure the safety of the community and to comply with federal law and institutional policies.

In cases indicating pattern, predation, threat, weapons, and/or violence, MCW may be unable to honor a request that no investigation or further action occur.  In cases where a reporting party has requested no formal investigation, and the circumstances allow MCW to honor that request, MCW will work to provide support and resources to the reporting party.

MCW reserves the right in all instances to conduct an investigation as it determines appropriate, either at the time a report is received or a later point in time, in the event additional information or evaluation dictate that a formal investigation is appropriate. The role of the reporting party (bystander, victim, etc.) will be considered when evaluating whether to honor requests for confidentiality.

Reporting to a Responsible Employee, Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator will entail privacy to the reporting party to the extent possible, and will include sharing reported information with those individuals or officials who have a need to know. The number of individuals with this knowledge will be as limited as possible to preserve the reporting party’s and/or victim’s privacy (if they differ).

An MCW employee or student may also report any allegation of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking to:

  • Police in the case of emergencies by calling 911.
  • Local law enforcement as listed on the MCW Sexual Misconduct/Title IX webpage.
  • MCW Public Safety (414) 955-8299. MCW Public Safety will assist in emergent and non-emergent cases.

Retaliation against anyone involved in a report or an investigation pursuant to this policy is strictly prohibited. Reports of retaliation should be made immediately to the Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Coordinator.

Any false information provided, or obstruction into the investigation process, by any party is considered a serious violation of this policy and may subject the non-compliant individual(s) to discipline in accordance with the applicable institutional policy/ies and Handbook(s).

Risk Reduction Strategies

With no intent to blame the Complainant and recognizing that only the perpetrators are responsible for sexual assault, the following strategies help reduce one’s risk of being in an unsafe situation including one that involves sexual assault or harassment (taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network, www.rainn.org)

  1. Be aware of surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
     
  2. Avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
     
  3. Walk with a purpose. Even if you do not know where you are going, act like you do.
     
  4. Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably is not the best place to be.
     
  5. Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags. This can make you appear more vulnerable.
     
  6. Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
     
  7. Carry a noise maker, like a whistle, and a small flashlight with you at all times (these can attach to key chains).
     
  8. Do not allow yourself to be isolated with someone you do not trust or someone you do not know.
     
  9. Avoid inserting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
     
  10. When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the gathering, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
     
  11. Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the US.).
     
  12. Do not leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you have left your drink alone, get a new one.
     
  13. Do not get intoxicated or take drugs to the point of incapacitation.
     
  14. Do not accept drinks from people you do not know and trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, do not drink from punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
     
  15. Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they have had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe place immediately.
     
  16. If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the US.). Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).
     
  17. If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:
     

    • Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong; it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.

    • Be true to yourself. Do not feel obligated to do anything you do not want to do. "I don't want to" is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.

    • Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you do not feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.

    • Lie. If you do not want to hurt the person’s feelings, it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.

  18. Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
     
  19. If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.
     
  20. Tell a sexual aggressor “NO” clearly and firmly.
     
  21. If you or someone you know is being abused, speak up or intervene.
     
  22. Get help by seeking counseling or support services – see resources listed in this policy or contact MCW Public Safety for a list of resources.
     
  23. Learn how to identify “red flags” in relationships so you can get out of a bad relationship and learn what to avoid in future relationships.
     
  24. Consider reporting any abuse, assault, violence or stalking to police, MCW Public Safety, the Title IX Coordinator, a Deputy Coordinator or a Responsible Employee.
     
  25. Consider getting a protective order from a court of competent jurisdiction.
     
  26. Educate yourself on what behaviors constitute domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking.
     
  27. If you find yourself in the position of being the initiator of sexual behavior, you owe respect to your potential partner. Clearly communicate your intentions to your sexual partner and give them a chance to clearly relate their intentions to you.
     
  28. Mixed messages from your sexual partner may be a clear indication that you should stop.
     
  29. Do not take advantage of someone’s drunkenness or drugged state.
     
  30. Understand that consent to some form of sexual behavior does not automatically imply consent to any other form of sexual behavior.

Warning Signs of Abusive Behavior

  1. Being afraid of your partner, or watching what you say or do to avoid a “blow up.”
     
  2. Feeling unworthy or feeling helpless about your relationship.
     
  3. Feeling isolated from family and friends due to your relationship.
     
  4. Hiding bruises or other injuries from family or friends.
     
  5. Being prevented by your partner from working, studying, going home or using technology (including your phone).
     
  6. Being monitored by your partner at work, home or school.
     
  7. Being forced or pressured to do something you don’t want to do

Active Bystander Intervention

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. Bystanders are defined as individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved in an incident but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it. MCW promotes a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm.

Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene

Ways to be an active bystander include:

  1. Watch out for friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are ok.
     
  2. Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.
     
  3. Speak up when someone discusses plans to take advantage of another person.
     
  4. Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
     
  5. Refer people to on or off campus resources for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.

Wisconsin Sex Offender Registry

The federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000 requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community on how to obtain information provided by the State concerning registered sex offenders. It also required sex offenders already required to register in a state to provide notice, as required under state law, of each institution of higher education in that state at which the person is employed, carries on a vocation, volunteers services or is a student.

The Wisconsin Department of Corrections maintains a Sex Offender Registry website. The site contains detailed program information and an offender search capability by offender name or specific location.

  References
  Attachments

Not Applicable

 

Effective Date:

Revision History:

Supersedes Policy:

Review Date:

Approved By:

07/02/2015

10/15/2015, 4/1/2016, 11/3/2016, 07/01/2018

N/A

N/A

/S/ John R. Raymond, Sr., MD, President and CEO
Medical College of Wisconsin

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